Eurosatory Tilts To­wards Se­cu­rity Busi­ness

The high­light of this year’s event was 370 new prod­uct launches, up from 350 in 2010. The 152 del­e­ga­tions from 84 coun­tries con­firmed that eco­nomic gloom or no gloom, Eurosatory is the des­ti­na­tion for land and se­cu­rity busi­ness.

SP's LandForces - - SHOW REPORT - R. CHANDRAKANTH IN PARIS

DE­SPITE A DIF­FI­CULT ECO­NOMIC en­vi­ron­ment, Eurosatory 2012, a lead­ing land, air and se­cu­rity event, pulled off a strong per­for­mance this year. The barom­e­ter be­ing the in­creas­ing at­ten­dance by in­ter­na­tional ex­hibitors and vis­i­tors and Eurosatory re­ported grow­ing per­cent­ages—70 per cent and 48 per cent re­spec­tively. The 152 del­e­ga­tions from 84 coun­tries con­firmed that eco­nomic gloom or no gloom, Eurosatory is the des­ti­na­tion for land and se­cu­rity busi­ness.

The high­light of this year’s event was 370 new prod­uct launches, up from 350 in 2010. The clus­ters for un­manned aerial ve­hi­cles (UAVs)-un­manned ground ve­hi­cles (UGVs); sim­u­la­tion; op­er­a­tional medicine; day and night vi­sion; de­fence and se­cu­rity op­er­a­tional in­di­vid­ual equip­ment; high tech­nol­ogy sub­con­tract­ing; em­bed­ded elec­tron­ics and chem­i­cal, bi­o­log­i­cal, ra­di­o­log­i­cal, nu­clear and high-yield ex­plo­sives (CBRNe), etc were tick­ing with ac­tiv­ity.

Se­cu­ri­ties Busi­ness to the Fore

While de­fence spend in most de­vel­oped economies are get­ting slashed, the need, how­ever, to en­hance se­cu­rity ca­pa­bil­i­ties has opened up op­por­tu­ni­ties for those in the se­cu­ri­ties busi­ness. The Bri­tish think tank, In­ter­na­tional In­sti­tute for Strate­gic Stud­ies, has re­ported that de­fence spend by Euro­pean NATO states dropped by an av­er­age of 7.4 per cent per coun­try in real terms be­tween 2008 and 2010, with dou­ble-digit drops in France, Italy and Spain.

Eurosatory con­sol­i­dated its po­si­tion in se­cu­rity (po­lice, civil se­cu­rity, fire ser­vice) by gath­er­ing com­pa­nies which dis­played ded­i­cated or dual of­fer­ing. About 40 per cent (560 ex­hibitors) be­longed to this seg­ment.

The largest group of ex­hibitors was from the US (158), fol­lowed by the United King­dom (109) and Is­rael (59), not to miss out on the Rus­sian, In­dian, Chi­nese, Korean and In­done­sians who swarmed the event. This time five new pavil­ions were added and four of them were from the East—In­done­sia, Korea, Pak­istan and the United Arab Emi­rates and from the West was Turkey.

The re­frain at Eurosatory, no doubt, was that orig­i­nal equip­ment man­u­fac­tur­ers (OEMs) had to con­tinue look­ing East to keep their busi­nesses go­ing. The Asian pie, with In­dia lead­ing, was hard to ig­nore for any OEM. The need to woo the Asian buyer was ev­i­dent. The world­wide arms mar­ket is said to be worth over $1 tril­lion a year.

At the event, the Euro­pean De­fence Agency (EDA) an­nounced that it was part­ner­ing with 17 lead­ing Euro­pean de­fence firms to un­der­take a study of the land sys­tem in­dus­trial base. The study will look at ca­pa­bil­ity gaps and pos­si­ble con­flicts in five-year, 15-year and 30-year in­cre­ments. The ef­fort hopes to iden­tify what ca­pa­bil­i­ties the Euro­pean land de­fence in­dus­try, which com­prises 25 per cent of all Euro­pean de­fence spend­ing, may need to ad­dress in or­der to ef­fec­tively meet fu­ture threats.

Good In­dian Pres­ence

For In­dian com­pa­nies, Eurosatory of­fered a plat­form to en­hance their pres­ence in the world de­fence mar­kets, to ex­plore op­por­tu­ni­ties to be­come a part of the global sup­ply chain, to form joint ven­tures/part­ner­ships, etc. The In­dian pavil­ion was well at­tended and there were about a score com­pa­nies in­clud­ing the Hin­dus­tan Aero­nau­tics Lim­ited; De­fence Re­search and De­vel­op­ment Or­gan­i­sa­tion; Mishra Dhatu Nigam Lim­ited; Bharat Earth Movers Lim­ited; Bharat Elec­tron­ics Lim­ited; Bharat Dy­nam­ics Lim­ited; Gar­den Reach Ship­builders and Engi­neers Lim­ited; Mazagon Dock Lim­ited; Ord­nance Fac­tory Board; MKU Pvt Ltd; Off­set In­dia So­lu­tions; Al­li­ga­tor De­signs; Avaana; Mi­cromet ATI and oth­ers.

The In­dian del­e­ga­tion was led by the Min­is­ter of State for De­fence, Dr M.M. Pal­lam Raju, who in an ex­clu­sive in­ter­ac­tion with SP’s Land Forces said, “Eurosatory is an im­por­tant event for In­dia as we get to see here the lat­est of­fer­ings from OEMs from all over the world. As we have em­barked upon a mod­erni­sa­tion pro­gramme of the armed forces, at­tend­ing such events is al­ways ben­e­fi­cial. The gov­ern­ment is com­mit­ted to pro­vid­ing the best equip­ment to the In­dian soldier.”

New Prod­ucts and In­no­va­tions

The amaz­ing num­ber of new prod­uct launches, mostly in the se­cu­ri­ties busi­ness, is in­dica­tive of the grow­ing needs to counter asym­met­ric threats. The Rus­sians, the Is­raelis, the Chi­nese were dis­play­ing wares with lethal con­se­quences. Take, for in­stance, the Rus­sians who launched the ‘ter­mi­na­tor’ tank—Ural­vagon­za­vod BMPT with four anti-tank mis­sile launch­ers, a 7.62 ma­chine gun, 30mm AGS-17 au­to­matic grenade launch­ers and a two-man tur­ret with dual 30mm can­nons on top. The ex­po­si­tion of the Rus­sian del­e­ga­tion com­prised 14 com­pa­nies of the mil­i­taryin­dus­trial com­plex, rep­re­sent­ing about 200 prod­ucts and so­lu­tions.

The Chi­nese had the Sky Dragon, a sur­face-to-air mis­sile sys­tem with a 50-km range and 80 per cent shoot-down ef­fi­ciency. The sys­tem is said to be ca­pa­ble of aim­ing 12 in­ter­cep­tors si­mul­ta­ne­ously and can track up to 140 con­cur­rent in­bound threats.

Eurosatory, over the years, has been driv­ing home the point that de­fence tech­nolo­gies are dy­namic con­sid­er­ing that newer threats are emerg­ing faster and dead­lier. The warfight­ers have to be equipped with arms and com­mu­ni­ca­tion tech­nolo­gies that give them the fight­ing edge.

Eurosatory, over the years, has been driv­ing home the point that de­fence tech­nolo­gies are dy­namic con­sid­er­ing that newer threats are emerg­ing faster and dead­lier

Nex­ter’s CAE­SAR

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