Stardust (English) - - NEWS -

Is So­cial Me­dia the right plat­form to present one­self, es­pe­cially a pub­lic fig­ure? Is it a boon or a curse? It’s a bit of both. It’s a boon be­cause it is at a time where one can be on a di­rect plat­form with the world. You can clar­ify your stand or reach out to peo­ple. So it has brought peo­ple closer. It is not a curse, it was meant for a cer­tain kind of devel­op­ment, but un­for­tu­nately it has been taken over by po­lit­i­cal wars. What has hap­pened is, sen­sa­tion­al­ism has be­come a curse. To­day any­thing you say is twisted, turned and blown out of pro­por­tion. When the whole in­tol­er­ance de­bate hap­pened, I did not tag Aamir (Khan) in any of my tweets. I said a few things which were for him, but there were an­other set of tweets which were to­tally talk­ing about the coun­try and us as cit­i­zens. But some part of the me­dia used this state­ment with a head­line that read, Raveena Slams Aamir (laughs). For god sake, he is a friend of mine. If you are my friend, we will have a good healthy de­bate, no­body is slam­ming each other. But the me­dia made it to be a war of words, which was not the case.

To­day, opin­ions from celebri­ties on cer­tain mat­ters tend to of­fend peo­ple. Do you feel, your free­dom of speech is be­ing curbed, when you are un­der con­stant scru­tiny from peo­ple? I don’t think one should care. If you stand up and say you love your coun­try and can­not see it be­ing de­famed, does that mean you are fak­ing na­tion­al­ism? To­day we have reached a point where on na­tional tele­vi­sion we are de­bat­ing whether we should re­spect our na­tional an­them or not. That is ba­sic cour­tesy and re­spect that we are taught in life. If that ba­sic re­spect wouldn’t be there, there wouldn’t be sol­diers stand­ing at the bor­der tak­ing bul­lets for our flag. Things have be­come po­lit­i­cally di­vided. So­cial me­dia has lost its charm of be­ing a place where you can ac­tu­ally voice your opin­ions, be­cause of the fact that pol­i­tics has taken over. If you say you love your coun­try, you are sup­posed to be a syco­phant for the rul­ing party and then if you say that the coun­try is a mess, then you are a hero with the op­po­si­tion party. You are go­ing to be abused both ways. It is not nec­es­sary to have a de­gree from some high- fundu univer­sity just to ex­press your views and be a con­cerned ci­ti­zen.

Okay, so how should one present him­self on so­cial me­dia? I feel ev­ery celebrity has a cer­tain re­spon­si­bil­ity. We are re­spon­si­ble for a few things or for few peo­ple who look up to us and about how it is go­ing to be car­ried for­ward. So, I def­i­nitely would ad­vice cau­tion (laughs) which I am learn­ing to do my­self now be­cause I can see how things can be ma­nip­u­lated.

Have you ever reached a point where you thought ‘it’s bet­ter not to say any­thing’? No, but now one has to give dis­claimers (laughs) like the movies are do­ing these days. Re­cently, a jour­nal­ist from a re­puted web­site, tweeted some­thing that re­ally hurt me. He was gen­er­ally call­ing the whole Hindi film in­dus­try and its peo­ple a riff-raff. So I had a per­sonal chat with him and

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