Sewn gar­ments are not hand­crafted, bonded ones are: H&H

Stitch World - - EVENT -

Bond­ing ap­pli­ca­tions have been find­ing their place in ap­parel prod­ucts while ditch­ing the tra­di­tional sewing; thanks to the grow­ing trend of fit­ness among con­sumers. Bond­ing and weld­ing of seams in fit­ness ap­parel, be it ath­let­icwear, yo­gawear, sportswear or ath­leisure, not only en­hances the aes­thet­ics but also the func­tional as­pect of the gar­ments as well.

Com­fort­a­bil­ity of a gar­ment mat­ters a lot. How the gar­ment hugs the body, how it feels to the body form in­side, etc., are the ma­jor fac­tors that a wearer takes into ac­count while buy­ing a sportswear. If a gar­ment is too tight or has un­cleaned seams, it rubs on the skin. Bond­ing, in this case, helps to re­move all such prob­lems.

It pro­vides the nec­es­sary stretch and re­cov­ery fea­ture to the gar­ment and helps in con­trol­ling the shape of the mus­cles as well. “That is why, de­spite higher pric­ing, bond­ing is much more pre­ferred in sportswear,” claims An­shu­man Dash, Mar­ket­ing Di­rec­tor of H& H.

Sewing has al­ways been con­nected with the skill of the sewing op­er­a­tor, and the com­mon no­tion that pre­vails is that the golden hands of the op­er­a­tors make the magic. But ac­cord­ing to An­shu­man, bond­ing is hand­crafted and not sewing.

He ex­plains, “In sewing process, the ma­chine guides the op­er­a­tor while cre­at­ing the seam. But in the case of bond­ing, we have to deskill the op­er­a­tion. More­over, if any­thing goes wrong, the op­er­a­tor can open the seam and stitch it again, but there is no go­ing back in bond­ing. So, one has to be 100 per cent sure of the seams be­fore ex­pos­ing it to the ma­chine.”

Once the bond­ing is done, there is no check­ing or rework process. Bond­ing re­quires a num­ber of spot mark­ing on gar­ments that guide the op­er­a­tor to pre­cisely cre­ate the seam. De­spite all the ad­van­tages that bond­ing has to of­fer, it is still not achiev­ing that pop­u­lar­ity. One rea­son is the lack of proper knowl­edge that a gar­ment of 100% cot­ton can­not be bonded. “Peo­ple think that it only works with polyester and that’s not true,” in­forms An­shu­man.

Mass man­u­fac­tur­ing of prod­ucts calls for sewing large num­ber of pieces in less time. Bond­ing needs pa­tience… It de­liv­ers the qual­ity as re­quired, but the speed and time re­quired can­not be al­tered. This gives bond­ing a low edge com­pared to sewing. “It is pop­u­lar in out­er­wear be­cause out­er­wear fabric is some­times dif­fi­cult to stitch. For out­er­wear man­u­fac­tur­ers, bond­ing is a faster process, but the same thing in the man­u­fac­tur­ing of T-shirts in­creases time and price,” ex­plains An­shu­man.

Talk­ing of the US mar­ket, An­shu­man tells that H& H started sell­ing ma­chines in the coun­try two years back. Sell­ing few ma­chines, the com­pany did not change much any mar­ket­ing pol­icy for US but has re­cently made some mod­i­fi­ca­tions. “We have changed our pol­icy on how to make small units,” con­cludes An­shu­man.

Com­fort­a­bil­ity of a gar­ment mat­ters a lot. How the gar­ment hugs the body, how it feels to the body form in­side, etc., are the ma­jor fac­tors that a wearer takes into ac­count while buy­ing a sportswear. Bond­ing, in this case, helps to re­move all such prob­lems. De­spite all the ad­van­tages that bond­ing has to of­fer, it is still not achiev­ing that much pop­u­lar­ity. One rea­son is the lack of proper knowl­edge.

An­shu­man Dash (sec­ond from left), Mar­ket­ing Di­rec­tor, H&H with his team­mates

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