STOR­IZEN CON­TRIB­UTE - Mamta Joshi

Storizen Magazine - - Contents - by Mamta Joshi

The Zen Mo­ment

On a long week­end, the mo­ment I de­cide that I am go­ing to stay late and get up late, it never hap­pens. The vil­lain that is re­spon­si­ble for this ob­ses­sive dis­ci­pline is of­ten re­ferred to as the in­ter­nal body clock, the cir­ca­dian rhythm, that tells our bod­ies when to sleep, rise, eat—of­ten be­com­ing a wet blan­ket in present­day life where heavy party scene goes around dur­ing big fat wed­dings, big fat fes­ti­vals or just fat get-to­geth­ers with friends and loved ones seek­ing leisure hours af­ter XXL work­ing hours. It is def­i­nitely not a treat to wake up late in the af­ter­noon, to have break­fast at lunchtime and laze till din­ner which could stretch late into mid­night. The par­ents may not be around to chide any­more but the blad­der and the bow­els take dis­ci­plinary ac­tion on any freaky be­hav­ior and pe­nal­ize gutsy reck­less­ness for days. Lexis changes with life­style pres­sures that had made one abuse one­self with junk food and al­co­hol. Choles­terol with LDL, HDL dom­i­nates every breath. The acid re­flux keeps the deep-fried snacks and tangy chut­neys out of reach. The ubiq­ui­tous bot­tle gourd (lauki), which went

un­no­ticed, be­comes as vi­tal as oxy­gen. For var­i­ous ail­ments kitchen- shelf magic is re­dis­cov­ered with the mirac­u­lous pow­ers of fenu­greek (me­thi), oregano (ajwain), asafoetida( heeng), fen­nel (saunf) and turmeric (haldi). One is for­ever ex­chang­ing notes about di­eti­cians, phys­io­ther­a­pists, per­sonal fit­ness train­ers, med­i­ta­tion gu­rus, natur­opaths and pranic heal­ers. Af­ter mess­ing up body, mind, and soul, one learns to kow­tow be­fore the cir­ca­dian rhythm as one moves for­ward on the learn­ing curve of life.

The saga­cious Aris­to­tle was of the view that

essence of life is in learn­ing that there is a lot of un­learn­ing to be done. It is well to be up be­fore day­break, for such habits con­tribut­ing to health, wealth, and wis­dom. Steve Pavlina, a pop­u­lar mo­ti­va­tor, and self-help life coach are of the view that morn­ing hours fill life with beauty and en­er­gize the body like noth­ing else. He elab­o­rates, “In my early 20s, I rarely went to bed be­fore mid­night, and I’d al­most al­ways sleep in late. I usu­ally didn’t start hit­ting my stride each day un­til late af­ter­noon. But af­ter a while, I couldn’t ig­nore the high cor­re­la­tion be­tween suc­cess and rise early, even in my own life. On those rare oc­ca­sions where I did get up early, I no­ticed that my pro­duc­tiv­ity was al­most al­ways higher, not just in the morn­ing but all through­out the day.

And I also no­ticed a sig­nif­i­cant feel­ing of well-be­ing.” The proac­tive goalachiever that Steve was, he set out to be­come a ha­bit­ual early riser. He promptly set up his alarm clock for 5 am. Once he got used

Af­ter mess­ing up body, mind and soul, one learns to kow­tow be­fore the cir­ca­dian rhythm as one moves for­ward on the learn­ing curve of life.

On those rare oc­ca­sions where I did get up early, I no­ticed that my pro­duc­tiv­ity was al­most al­ways higher, not just in the morn­ing but all through­out the day. And I also no­ticed a sig­nif­i­cant feel­ing of well­be­ing.

to that ex­tra time in the morn­ing, it did a lot to re­duce stress. He felt no need to rush around and that set up his mood for the rest of the day.

Due to de­mand­ing pets and school go­ing kids, I have by force of habit, be­come a morn­ing per­son. I feel happy when I get up early, come out into the gar­den to soak in the panoramic view that dawn un­folds be­fore me, as the sky turns golden streaked with crim­son red and grey hues while the epiphany of hun­dreds of birds pays twit­ter­ing trib­ute to life. The cool breeze does noth­ing to ruf­fle the si­lence, in fact, trans­forms the or­di­nary day into an ex­tra­or­di­nary one by its sheer magic. It is the hour for my in­ner si­lence, the ‘me time’ that be­longs only to my­self. That hour of de­li­cious soli­tude is enough to keep me charged for the rest of the day other, with­out get­ting cranky. Morn­ing­ness can ring in pos­i­tiv­ity and who else but Jalalud­din Rumi, a 13th-cen­tury poet, can put it in a bet­ter way. “The breeze at dawn has se­crets to tell you Don’t go back to sleep You must ask for what you re­ally want

Don’t go back to sleep” So avoid hit­ting that snooze but­ton of the alarm. Let it ring out loud and early. We all have one glo­ri­ous life to live. Rise, move your butt out of bed and shine!

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