Those Who Eat Fast Food Have More In­dus­trial Chem­i­cals in Their Bod­ies

The Economic Times - - Around The World -

Peo­ple who re­ported eat­ing fast food in the last 24 hours had el­e­vated lev­els of some in­dus­trial chem­i­cals in their bod­ies, ac­cord­ing to a new anal­y­sis of data from federal nutrition sur­veys.

The study is the first broad look at how fast food may ex­pose the pub­lic to cer­tain chem­i­cals, called ph­tha­lates, that are used to make plas­tics more flex­i­ble and durable. The chem­i­cals, which don’t oc­cur in na­ture, are com­mon in cos­met­ics, soap, food pack­ag­ing, floor­ing, win­dow blinds and other con­sumer prod­ucts. The Cen­ters for Disease Con­trol says “ph­tha­late ex­po­sure is wide­spread in the US pop­u­la­tion.” Though the health con­se­quences of en­coun­ter­ing these sub­stances aren’t fully known, sci­en­tists have in­creas­ingly fo­cused on their ef­fects on health and devel­op­ment, par­tic­u­larly for preg­nant women and chil­dren. Re­search in rats has shown that they can dis­rupt the male re- pro­duc­tive sys­tem, and there’s ev­i­dence for sim­i­lar ef­fects in hu­mans.

The lat­est re­search sug­gests that fast food is a sig­nif­i­cant source of the chemic a l s , which may leach into food from ma­chin­ery used in pro­cessin­gor­pack­ag­ing, or from gloves worn by work­ers.

The chem­i­cals, which don’t oc­cur in na­ture, are com­mon in cos­met­ics, soap, food pack­ag­ing, floor­ing, blinds etc

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