Cor­po­rate Train­ing Pays. Sim­plilearn this Les­son now

Large tech­nol­ogy com­pa­nies are keen on skill train­ing of em­ploy­ees in the wake of pro­posed H-1B visa re­forms in the United States

The Economic Times - - Disruption: Startups & Tech - Shadma.Shaikh @times­group.com

Bengaluru: On­line train­ing and cer­ti­fi­ca­tion course provider Sim­plilearn is switch­ing its fo­cus to cor­po­rate train­ing from in­di­vid­ual or con­sumer-fo­cussed pro­grammes.

This move comes as large tech­nol­ogy com­pa­nies get keen on skill train­ing of em­ploy­ees in the wake of the pro­posed H-1B visa re­forms in the US that will re­quire highly skilled em­ploy­ees to jus­tify the in­creased min­i­mum wage and a grow­ing in­tent of skilling back in In­dia.

The MayField and He­lion-backed com­pany is util­is­ing this as an op­por­tu­nity to get a fair mar­ket share of the en­ter­prise skill trai- ning in­dus­try where it plans to spend at least a cou­ple of mil­lion dol­lars in the next one year, Sim­plilearn’s chief ex­ec­u­tive Kr­ishna Ku­mar told ET.

“So far we had been work­ing with large cor­po­rate train­ing in a re­ac­tive man­ner, based on the de­mand we saw from the sec­tor,” Ku­mar said. “From now on our pri­mary fo­cus is go­ing to be cor­po­rate train­ing.”

The com­pany plans to add to its cus­tomer base at least 100 en­ter­prises com­pa­nies in 2017, with em­ployee size of about 5,000 peo­ple, he said.

The Trump ad­min­is­tra­tion’s pro­posed Bill re­quires work­ers hold­ing H-1B visas to be paid a min­i­mum of $100,000, up from $60,000 at present. In­dia’s IT outsourcing in­dus­try, which ac­counts for about 9.5% of the coun­try’s GDP and em­ploys nearly 3.7 mil­lion pro­fes­sion­als, will be largely af­fected by the pro­posed leg­is­la­tion that in­tends to guar­an­tee a place for high­paid, high-skilled labour. This means train­ing for soughtafter skills in the fields of data sciences, big data and cloud com­put­ing will in­crease as com­pa­nies eval­u­ate their choices in terms of skill ac­qui­si­tion and tal­ent ac­qui­si­tion. “Large en­ter­prises pre­fer to train ex­ist­ing em­ploy­ees on hot skills rather than hir­ing new peo­ple, as it helps them in em­ployee re­ten­tion,” Ku­mar said. The com­pany has in the past few months di­rected its ef­forts to tweak­ing its learn­ing tool to suit the de­mands of cor­po­rate train­ing. Cor­po­rate train­ing pro­gram- mes re­quire cus­tomi­sa­tion, such as ac­ces­si­bil­ity to train­ing pro­grammes in spe­cific hours, in­cen­tivis­ing the plat­form for higher com­ple­tion rate and mon­i­tor­ing of progress at man­age­rial level. Ku­mar said the com­pany has been work­ing on these im­pro­vi­sa­tions on its plat­form to suit the en­ter­prise needs. It will con­tinue its in­di­vid­ual train­ing pro­grammes, though.

Sim­plilearn counts large en­ter­prises such as Bank of Amer­ica, Bar­clays, Sam­sung and Sales­force among its en­ter­prise clients.

The cor­po­rate elearn­ing mar­ket was said to be worth $12 bil­lion in the US alone in 2015 and is ex­pected to ex­pand at a com­pound an­nual growth rate of about 11% to hit $31 bil­lion glob­ally by 2020, ac­cord­ing to a mar­ket study by Tech­navio.

KRISHNAKUMAR Chief Ex­ec­u­tive, Sim­plilearn Large en­ter­prises pre­fer to train ex­ist­ing em­ploy­ees on hot skills rather than hir­ing new peo­ple, as it helps them in em­ployee re­ten­tion

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