McCain Be­comes Critic-in-Chief of the Trump Ad­min­is­tra­tion

Ari­zona sen­a­tor emerges as an out­spo­ken de­fender of long­stand­ing Repub­li­can ver­i­ties on for­eign pol­icy and as one of his party’s most bit­ing crit­ics of the new com­man­der-in-chief

The Economic Times - - Around The World -

Wash­ing­ton: Sen­a­tor John McCain has long had a rep­u­ta­tion as a po­lit­i­cal mav­er­ick. But with the rise of a pres­i­dent who has vowed to shat­ter the­oldorder,McCain­hase­mergedas an out­spo­ken de­fender of long­stand­ing Repub­li­can ver­i­ties on for­eign pol­icy and as one of his party’s most bit­ing crit­ics of the new com­man­der-in-chief.

Newly r e - ele c t e d to a si x-yea r ter m and ea­ger to wield the mega­phone that comes with the chair­man­ship of the pow­er­ful Armed Ser­vices Com­mit­tee, Mc C a i n has re­peat­edly pushed back on the White House’s na­tional se­cu­rity poli­cies in its first weeks. In a star turn at a se­cu­rity con­fer­ence in Munich on Fri­day, he de­liv­ered a force­ful cri­tique of Pres­i­dent Trump’s “Amer­ica First” vi­sion be­fore a re­cep­tive au­di­ence of ex­perts and al­lied of­fi­cials wor­ried about Amer­i­can drift from a sev­en­decade-old West­ern al­liance. “Make no mist a ke, my friends, th­ese are dan­ger­ous times,” McCain said. “But you should not count Amer­ica out, and we should not count each other out.” Nor did McCain hes­i­tate to punc­ture Trump’s in­sis­tence that his WhiteHou­seisop­er­at­ing­likea“fine­tuned ma­chine”. “In many re­spects, this ad­min­is­tra­tion is in dis­ar­ray, and they’ve got a lot of work to do,” he said. A day later, in an in­ter­view for “Meet the Press”, McCain chal­lenged Trump’s con­tention that the news me­dia is “the en­emy of the Amer­i­can peo­ple”. “The first thing that dic­ta­tors do is shut down the press,” he said, adding that while he was not calling the pres­i­dent a dic­ta­tor, “we need to learn the lessons of his­tory”. For a sen­a­tor who sup­ports free trade, backs NATO, re­mains deeply sus­pi­cious of Rus­sian in­ten­tions and has fa­vored an as­sertive for­eign pol­icy, in­clud­ing the war in Iraq, the dif­fer­ences with Trump have been pro­found. “The prin­ci­ples that Sen­a­tor McCain has es­poused have an­i­mated Amer­i­can for­eign pol­icy for decades,” said Richard Fon­taine, a for­mer for­eign pol­icy ad­viser to McCain.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from India

© PressReader. All rights reserved.