A splen­did col­lec­tion of mes­meris­ing minia­ture art

Meet four art con­nois­seurs and their splen­did col­lec­tion of minia­ture arts that are too adorable to pass by

The Ideal Home and Garden - - Contents - RE­SEARCH: ARSHMEET KAUR

How did you get in­tro­duced to Minia­ture art?

I fell in love with it when I was 19 and saw some minia­tures in the Ri­jks mu­seum in Amsterdam. I was for­tu­nate enough to have a pro­fes­sor at the univer­sity who al­lowed me to do an in­de­pen­dent study that in­volved land­scape minia­ture paint­ing.

What is the fun and the chal­leng­ing part about it?

For me, mak­ing it is fun as I love get­ting lost in the de­tails with tiny brushes, cre­at­ing minia­ture worlds and sur­fac­ing hours later. The chal­leng­ing part has been find­ing an au­di­ence and a mar­ket for it. For a long time gal­leries were re­luc­tant to show the work be­cause it didn’t take up much space on the wall, and wasn’t very prof­itable for them.

What all ma­te­ri­als and medi­ums do you pre­fer to use?

My cur­rent favourite medium is oil on cop­per, although I have painted on can­vas, panel, my­lar and plex­i­glas in the past. All had their ad­van­tages, but cop­per is my favourite for the smooth tex­ture and warm lu­mi­nos­ity it brings to any­thing on top of it.

How much time does it take to com­plete one project?

Each paint­ing takes be­tween 10-20 hours. The projects are se­ries of paint­ings, each tak­ing about a year to com­plete. I’ve re­cently gone back to finish a se­ries, I started in 2015 called “Cycling Guide to Lil­liput”, which was in­ter­rupted by the birth of my son.

Your art is cur­rently in­spired from?

The cur­rent project is based on the long dis­tance cycling trips I take through Europe in the sum­mer.

Your dream project?

The work I’m mak­ing right now is my dream project - minia­ture paint­ings based on cycling trips are some­thing I’ve al­ways wanted to do.

How did you get in­tro­duced to minia­ture art?

We’re a fam­ily of artists, and I started sketch­ing live por­traits at the age of seven. I used to sit with my dad in the evenings and pre­pare colours from pig­ments and nat­u­ral ma­te­ri­als. And I be­lieve I al­ways had the pa­tience and tem­per needed as an artist.

What is the fun and the chal­leng­ing part about it?

Minia­ture art as an In­dian her­itage has lost its tra­di­tional value and keep­ing this art form alive through my works has def­i­nitely been a chal­lenge.

What all ma­te­ri­als and medi­ums do you pre­fer to use?

All the colours I use are 100 per cent nat­u­ral, made out of veg­eta­bles, flow­ers and pre­cious and semi-pre­cious stones like emer­alds, rubies and di­a­monds.

How much time does it take to com­plete one project?

Its varies from project to project. Gen­er­ally a life size por­trait takes a month or half to com­plete. Wall arts, fresco work projects in res­i­dences and show­rooms gen­er­ally take a month to three months, de­pend­ing on the area.

You art is cur­rently in­spired from?

My art col­lec­tion fo­cuses on the roy­al­ties of the coun­try and also on the fu­sion of In­dian and Euro­pean art, which gives it a sense of fu­sion and it blends well with the new age mod­ern houses as well as the tra­di­tional ones.

Your dream project?

I am very close to see­ing my dream project com­ing to life. We are open­ing a ‘Cen­tre of Ex­cel­lence’ in the coun­try to teach this tra­di­tional art form and its vari­ant di­men­sions.

How did you get in­tro­duced to Minia­ture art?

I’ve al­ways had a fas­ci­na­tion with toys, small an­i­mals and minia­ture fig­ures. The idea of leav­ing minia­ture fig­ures on the street came to me in 2006 while I was work­ing as an art di­rec­tor in Lon­don.

What is the fun and the chal­leng­ing part about it?

Work­ing on such a small scale can be dif­fi­cult at first, but over the years it has be­come sec­ond na­ture to me. The pho­tog­ra­phy side of my work is more chal­leng­ing as it of­ten in­volves an el­e­ment of luck - find­ing the right lo­ca­tion, the right light and weather con­di­tions to bring a scene to life.

What all ma­te­ri­als and medi­ums do you pre­fer to use?

The minia­tures that I use are rail­way fig­ures that I cus­tomise and paint. I also make a lot of ‘props’ for my scenes. I have boxes full of in­sects and lit­ter that I have found and I can­ni­balise ran­dom model kits to cre­ate new items. Find­ing ex­ist­ing street ar­chi­tec­ture and fur­ni­ture is also im­por­tant.

How much time does it take to com­plete one project?

That can re­ally de­pend on the com­plex­ity of the project. Some in­stal­la­tions just in­volve one fig­ure and the lo­ca­tion where as other in­volve more com­pli­cated model-mak­ing and lo­ca­tion scout­ing in cities and this can make a work go for a few weeks be­fore it is com­pleted.

You art is cur­rently in­spired from?

I have been lately in­spired by the nat­u­ral world and the ways it en­croaches on the city and man-made en­vi­ron­ment. I’ve been cre­at­ing in­stal­la­tions that re-pur­pose lit­ter, of­ten us­ing light­ing to il­lu­mi­nate scenes, much like the dio­ra­mas I use to make when I was a child.

Your dream project?

I am a huge Star Wars fan and I would love to cre­ate a se­ries of works be­hind the scenes of one of the new movies.

How did you get in­tro­duced to Minia­ture art?

The con­cept of mix­ing ob­jects of dif­fer­ent sizes was used par­tic­u­larly in Amer­i­can cin­ema, tele­vi­sion and ad­ver­tis­ing when I was grow­ing up. As a hobby, I started tak­ing pic­tures of tiny fig­ures and food around the end of 2002. Af­ter some of my im­ages were pub­lished in Europe and went vi­ral, Big Ap­petites be­came my full­time ca­reer.

What is the fun and the chal­leng­ing part about it?

Food is very chal­leng­ing to work with, it can be wet, soft or can have oil which stains the back­drop. In terms of fun, it is al­ways a treat when fine art col­lec­tors pur­chase prints of my pho­to­graphs.

What all ma­te­ri­als and medi­ums do you pre­fer to use?

Food and 3D printed plas­tic fig­ures.

How much time does it take to com­plete one project?

In all of the years mak­ing these im­ages I’ve never set a timer or even paid at­ten­tion to the time. What is im­por­tant is to work un­til I’ve found a suc­cess­ful im­age. Some of my im­ages are sim­ple. Oth­ers are more com­plex. They take as much time to make as it takes.

Your art is cur­rently in­spired from?

Cin­ema. Tele­vi­sion. Ad­ver­tis­ing. Toys I played with as a kid. In­spi­ra­tion is ev­ery­where.

TINA BROD­SKY

SLINKACHU

CHRISTO­PHER BOFFOLI

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