‘Soft and del­i­cate’

Soft tex­tures, pas­tel hues and sheer fin­ishes blend to cre­ate a del­i­cate and beau­ti­ful re­tail space for Nay­omi, a lead­ing lin­gerie brand in the Mid­dle East. De­signed by Kin­ner­s­ley Kent De­sign (Lon­don/Dubai), the Nay­omi Princess Con­cept store of­fers a rela

VM&RD - - INTERNATIONAL DESIGN - Chanda Ku­mar

Nay­omi, launched by the Ka­mal Os­man Jamjoom Group in 1992, is the lead­ing lin­gerie and nightwear re­tailer in the Mid­dle East and known for its fem­i­nine prod­ucts that of­fer in­ter­na­tional de­signs with an Ori­en­tal twist. The brand Nay­omi, which means "soft and del­i­cate" in Ara­bic, is present in over 130 stores across the six GCC states. The brand re­cently un­veiled its new Princess con­cept stores, which is high on fash­ion, lux­ury and fem­i­nine el­e­ments. The re­designed store con­cept gives the space a softer and more fem­i­nine feel, where a spa­cious shop­ping en­vi­ron­ment has also been cre­ated. The brand has cur­rently launched four stores with the new de­sign con­cept, with the first opened in the Fu­jairah City Cen­tre. “We wanted to de­sign a store en­vi­ron­ment that was con­sis­tent with our brand strat­egy to of­fer our cus­tomers a beau­ti­ful glam­orous en­vi­ron­ment to shop in. Nay­omi be­lieves that ev­ery woman is a princess who loves lux­ury, be­ing pam­pered, feel­ing pretty and fem­i­nine and who wants to look her best. We want our cus­tomers to feel that they are shop­ping inside a palace, and the lux­ury ev­ery princess de­serves,” avers Ka­mal Os­man Jamjoom, CEO, KOJ Group. With an av­er­age store size of 130 sqm, the brand set clear zon­ing cri­te­ria based on cus­tomer cen­tric life­styles to en­able con­ve­nient shop­ping and in-store way find­ing. The store de­sign con­cept sig­na­ture was in­spired from lo­cal cul­ture. “We also wanted it to be a con­tem­po­rary play on the princess theme and not too lit­eral. Our brief was to mod­ernise our brand im­age but to also en­sure our Ara­bic her­itage was re­tained to dif­fer­en­ti­ate us from the in­ter­na­tional brands,” Ka­mal ex­plains. The bou­tique store front was de­signed with bay win­dow style ar­chi­tec­ture with form and col­ors play­ing a sig­nif­i­cant role in cre­at­ing a dif­fer­en­ti­ated look. Dark man­nequins help draw at­ten­tion to the fash­ion mer­chan­dise pre­sented in the win­dows. The closed back win­dows fea­ture fash­ion su­per graph­ics as a back drop to the fash­ion co­or­di­nated dis­play. The store in­te­ri­ors are neu­tral with in­ter­est­ing high­lights cre­ated with forms, col­ors and

fin­ishes on walls, ceil­ing and the floor. The store has been di­vided into two sec­tion­sev­ery day wear dis­played in the front half of the store and the spe­cial­ist and wed­ding at­tire at the rear. At­ten­tion is drawn to the store of­fer­ings and ser­vices with perime­ter wardrobe mer­chan­dise sys­tem which help to frame co­or­di­nated prod­uct clus­ters. The wardrobe sys­tem pro­trudes out at ninety de­grees to the wall at the cen­tre of the store. Ac­cord­ing to Kin­ner­s­ley Kent De­sign, this break in the perime­ter not only helps to cre­ate in­ter­est vis­ually but also di­vides the store into two sec­tions. At this mid­way point VM niches are cre­ated and black glass chan­de­liers hang down to frame the cen­tral ta­ble dis­play. Large tiered tables help present co­or­di­nated groups of mer­chan­dise. These tables are lined along the cen­tre of the store with smaller ta­ble of­fers break­ing up the other mid floor units to­wards the perime­ter. The fix­ture sys­tem is Vis­play Xero 4 floor units. The pro­file is only vis­i­ble as a dis­creet, ver­ti­cal shadow groove and thus also re­flects the brand’s high-qual­ity de­sign ex­pec­ta­tions. Ac­cord­ing to the de­sign firm, three main el­e­ments help to en­hance the cus­tomer's store

ex­pe­ri­ence, which in­clude the fit­ting rooms, ser­vice cen­tre and seat­ing area out­side the fit­ting rooms. An ex­ten­sion of the store, the fit­ting rooms have been de­signed with great de­tail in­clud­ing pan­elled doors and wall cov­er­ings to give a feel of dress­ing clos­ets and a seat­ing area to place gar­ments on. As for the ser­vice cen­tre, the area has been re­cessed into the back wall with a long pull out shelf to the rear, which is used to fold and gift wrap pur­chases. Key de­sign el­e­ments cre­ate drama and add to the Princess theme, in­clud­ing the use of crys­tals in the chan­de­liers, point of sale graphic hold­ers and large tiara's which sit on top of the wardrobes and frame the fo­cal light box on the rear wall. The wardrobes have a stencil painted on to them in the form of a panel de­tail to give a con­tem­po­rary look of a Ge­or­gian in­te­rior. The lighting de­sign is clearly bou­tique with a com­bi­na­tion of in-lighting for the wardrobes, in­di­rect LED am­bi­ent lighting from ceil­ing coves and ac­cent eye­balls to high­light prod­ucts and spe­cial fea­tures in the store. Since its launch, the Nay­omi Princess Store con­cept has re­ceived great re­sponse and pos­i­tive com­ments from cus­tomers af­ter each new open­ing. “The Mall of the Emi­rates, Dubai flag­ship re­fit in par­tic­u­lar has per­formed be­yond ex­pec­ta­tion, achiev­ing 68% growth dur­ing Au­gust, the first full month of trade since the open­ing. This re­ally il­lus­trates that our cus­tomers are lov­ing the new store de­sign. So far, me­dia re­port­ing and cus­tomer feed­back is that the Princess de­sign shows that Nay­omi con­tin­ues to evolve as an as­pi­ra­tional brand that is sen­si­tive to Mid­dle Eastern cul­ture. We feel this has strength­ened the brand im­age. This is the year of Nay­omi’s 20th an­niver­sary, and launch­ing this new de­sign is just the be­gin­ning of the next stage of the brand’s nat­u­ral evo­lu­tion,” Ka­mal con­cludes. The brand plans to roll out over 15 new, and re­fur­bish 10 ex­ist­ing stores in the Princess Con­cept De­sign within the next 6 months

The bou­tique store front was de­signed with bay win­dow style ar­chi­tec­ture with form and col­ors play­ing a sig­nif­i­cant role in cre­at­ing a dif­fer­en­ti­ated look

The lighting de­sign is clearly bou­tique with a com­bi­na­tion of in-lighting for the wardrobes, in­di­rect LED am­bi­ent lighting from ceil­ing coves and ac­cent eye­balls to high­light prod­ucts and spe­cial fea­tures in the store

Win­dows flank­ing the atrium on each level help high­light the of­fer­ings through styl­ized dis­plays on that floor

At­ten­tion is drawn to the store of­fer­ings and ser­vices with perime­ter wardrobe mer­chan­dise sys­tem which help to frame co­or­di­nated prod­uct clus­ters

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