Jewel in the town

VM&RD - - RETAIL TALK -

Chin­ta­mani, the jew­elry brand from Mum­bai known for its rich her­itage, re-launched its flag­ship store at Prab­hadevi in a new and up­graded lux­u­ri­ous store de­sign con­cept. The fine jew­elry re­tailer, af­ter a long stretch of 24 years, de­cided to go for a makeover in re­sponse to its catch­ment trans­form­ing over the years from be­ing mid­dle class to a loyal up­mar­ket one.

The store is spread over more than 6000 sq. ft. across three floors and the op­u­lent de­sign con­cept was planned to be­fit a flag­ship mother store. As Vai­jayanti Kaigaonkar, Owner, Chin­ta­mani, says, “It is our largest and most pres­ti­gious show­room and we use it as the base for all our op­er­a­tions, and this store needed to be re­done any­way, con­sid­er­ing it was prac­ti­cally un­touched for 24 years.” The de­sign ob­jec­tive of the makeover was to cre­ate a space that is lux­u­ri­ous with a tra­di­tional touch and ap­pro­pri­ate for cus­tomers to be served to in­dulge in the very spe­cial of­fer­ings of the store. V-De­sign Ar­chi­tec­tural So­lu­tions Pvt Ltd was com­mis­sioned for this project. As Aftab Ban­duk­wala, Owner, V-De­sign Ar­chi­tec­tural So­lu­tions Pvt Ltd puts it, “The in­te­ri­ors had to be bold while lux­u­ri­ous and the fa­cade had to al­low max­i­mum vis­i­bil­ity till the far end of the store even as it made its own dis­tinc­tive state­ment. We started with re­mov­ing ev­ery bar­rier and po­si­tion­ing en­closed spa­ces at the rear cor­ners so that the full depth of the store could be ex­posed. The ex­ist­ing struc­ture and mez­za­nine were fussed over with curves and con­vo­lutes which were re­placed with clean bold lines ac­cen­tu­ated only through the lux­u­ri­ous se­lec­tion of ma­te­ri­als. We are widely known for cre­at­ing im­pos­ing fa­cades for the stores it de­signs and as much for de­tailed and thought­ful in­te­ri­ors that are true to the re­tailer’s pur­pose yet el­e­vat­ing the space sev­eral notches up in el­e­gance and class. So in a way de­sign­ing the store was sim­ple; the need was to do just that.” The de­sign team started off by un­der­stand­ing the client’s busi­ness pri­or­i­ties, the of­fer­ings and the cus­tomer ser­vice ethos to en­sure the de­sign so­lu­tion was in synch with the re­tailer’s busi­ness ob­jec­tives. As Aftab puts it, “We had ex­haus­tive ses­sions with the client to as­sim­i­late this data. It was op­por­tune that the en­tire ex­er­cise of re-brand­ing was par­al­lel to our re­design pro­posal and much thought­share worked to tweak the over­all di­rec­tion mak­ing the en­tire ex­er­cise more holis­tic and has there­fore proved tremen­dously suc­cess­ful in its out­come. The client was very ap­pre­cia­tive of our ex­po­sure and would of­ten ideate and al­ways in­volve me in their var­i­ous brand level de­ci­sions. This has uni­fied the over­all ex­pe­ri­ence for the cus­tomer and en­sured an im­pact that car­ries through in all spheres from the look down to even the prod­uct in cer­tain cases.”

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