JADOO KI JHAPPI

Glo­ri­ous hugs.

Woman's Era - - News - Kal­pana Shah

Af­ter the re­lease of the Munnab­hai MBBS movie in 2003, Indians re­alised and ac­cepted the im­por­tance of a hug also known as jadoo ki jhappi. This jadoo ki jhappi was lim­ited to western cul­ture and taboo in In­dia. It was em­bar­rass­ing in pub­lic to hug some­one of the op­po­site sex due to con­ser­va­tive tra­di­tional cul­ture, then re­versed to be­come trendy amongst young­sters. It is this very movie from where hugs be­came pop­u­lar and com­mon amongst peo­ple, even­tu­ally break­ing bar­ri­ers of hugs in In­dia. It is not that be­fore this movie hugs were not shared; they were but with reser­va­tions. Af­ter the movie, hugs be­came a new lan­guage of com­mu­ni­ca­tion in In­dia. Be­fore peo­ple just joined hands in Na­maste to greet their guests and loved ones. Now, most of the peo­ple greet with hugs. Pre­vi­ously this hug word was a sym­bol of western cul­ture. It is a western cul­ture for male friends to hug in a joy­ous greet­ing. A sim­i­lar hug, nor­mally ac­com­pa­nied by a kiss along the cheek, is also be­com­ing a cus­tom among western women at meet­ing or part­ing. A hug is a non­ver­bal com­mu­ni­ca­tion in­di­cat­ing sup­port, af­fec­tion, friend­ship, con­so­la­tion brother­hood, fa­mil­iar­ity and sym­pa­thy; all th­ese prod­ucts of love showed by an in­suf­fi­cient ver­bal com­mu­ni­ca­tion suf­ficed by a hug ap­par­ently fol­lowed by Indians.

A short or long squeeze be­tween

two peo­ple with warmth and af­fec­tion some­times com­bined with a kiss on a cheek is demon­strated by peo­ple is known as a hug. There is a non-re­cip­ro­cal hug, which demon­strates a re­la­tional prob­lem. A hug is a brief one-sec­ond squeeze or more de­pend­ing on re­la­tions. Usu­ally, the length of a hug is so­cially and cul­tur­ally de­ter­mined. In the case of lovers, and oc­ca­sion­ally oth­ers, the hips may also be pressed to­gether. Ei­ther it is prac­tised in pub­lic or pri­vately with­out any stigma at­tached to it. Mov­ing from a hand­shake to a hug is a sign of a close friend­ship such as best friends.

Hug­ging has been proven to have health ben­e­fits. One study has shown that hugs in­crease lev­els of oxy­tocin and re­duce blood pres­sure. A hug or touch can re­sult in the re­lease of oxy­tocin, dopamine, and sero­tonin, re­duc­ing stress hor­mones. Of­ten, it is found that in­ti­mate, pro­found hugs – very much of wrap­ping two bod­ies in­ti­mately – found more in an­i­mals and called cud­dles in hu­mans. Cud­dling is usu­ally amongst friends. Like good hug­ging, cud­dling too makes the body re­lease oxy­tocin, which boosts hap­pi­ness lev­els which has been sci­en­tif­i­cally proved. Ba­si­cally, a good hug is the fastest way for you to get oxy­tocin flow­ing in your body. Oxy­tocin, also known as the “love drug”, calms your ner­vous sys­tem and boosts pos­i­tive emo­tions. Here’s how a good hug re­sult­ing in oxy­tocin flow af­fects you:

✿ It low­ers your blood pres­sure, es­pe­cially help­ful if you’re feel­ing anx­ious.

✿ It low­ers your cor­ti­sol (the stress hor­mone), en­abling a higher qual­ity of sleep. ✿ It can in­crease your so­cial con­nec­tions and a sense of be­long­ing. When­ever we are sad, happy, up­set, an­gry or bro­ken, all we need is a hug. It can be called the health­ier unique grat­i­tude from a re­ceiver and a giver. They can be kids, adults, oldies, pets or any­one. HUGS are for all whether you suf­fer from phys­i­cal pain, emo­tional pain, lone­li­ness or de­pri­va­tion of love, want­ing to be loved. A hug fit, in at ev­ery place.well, there are so many types of hugs, but med­i­cally, a proper deep hug where the hearts are pressed to­gether is the best!

So hugs make you hap­pier, health­ier and more re­laxed – and bet­ter at im­prov­ing your re­la­tion­ships! It might be no sur­prise that stud­ies have also shown that cou­ples who hug more are more likely to stay to­gether. Some re­ports have even shown hugs can re­duce pain. A psy­chother­a­pist Vir­ginia Satir once said: “We need four hugs a day for sur­vival. We need eight hugs a day for main­te­nance. We need 12 hugs a day for growth.”

THE UN­EX­PECTED HUG

An un­ex­pected hug can be re­garded as an in­va­sion of a per­son's per­sonal space, but if it is re­cip­ro­cated it is an in­di­ca­tion that it is wel­come. Young chil­dren hug their par­ents when they feel threat­ened by an un­fa­mil­iar per­son, al­though this may be re­garded as cling­ing onto rather than hug­ging be­cause it demon­strates a need for pro­tec­tion rather than af­fec­tion. There are a few ma­jor in­ter­est­ing changes hap­pen­ing phys­i­cally and men­tally to the peo­ple re­ceiv­ing and giv­ing hugs, they are:

✿ A hug a day can im­prove any re­la­tion­ship by re­duc­ing the feel­ing of in­se­cu­rity and strength­en­ing trust.

✿ A hug in bed can treat in­som­nia.

✿ Hugs stim­u­late the thy­mus gland, which bal­ances the pro­duc­tion of white blood cells. ✿ Hugs boost the im­mune sys­tem and strengthen it.

✿ Hugs re­lease the dopamine also known as the plea­sure hor­mone.

✿ Hugs are known as a mir­a­cle drug that can lower any pain and make you feel bet­ter

✿ 21 Jan­uary is the day when the whole world cel­e­brates an an­nual un­of­fi­cial event named, Happy Hug­ging Day.

✿ It won’t be wrong if we said, that HUG stands for Healing, Un­der­stand­ing and Grat­i­tude.

✿ Autis­tic peo­ple hate be­ing hugged or giv­ing hugs.

✿ Eight Hugs a day pro­vides a men­tal sta­bil­ity and 12 Hugs a day im­proves psy­cho­log­i­cal de­vel­op­ment of a per­son.

✿ On an av­er­age, a hug is around 10 sec­onds long.

✿ A hug is equally ben­e­fi­cial for both, the one who is hug­ging and the one who is be­ing hugged due to the re­cip­ro­cal na­ture of the touch.

✿ A proper deep hug can end even the big­gest fights with ease.

✿ A study shows that chil­dren who get less hugs, learn to walk and learn to speak late. Some cul­tures do not use hug­ging as a sign of af­fec­tion or love, such as the Himba in Namibia. Dur­ing the Is­lamic fast­ing month of Ra­madan, it is (per­mis­si­ble) for some­one to hug dur­ing day­light hours to ob­tain self-con­trol. How­ever, if ac­com­pa­nied by li­bidi­nous urges, it is (sin­ful). We

REACH THE PIN­NA­CLES IN YOUR LIVES AND MAKE EV­ERY­ONE PROUD. THE WIDE­SPREAD IDEA OF COL­LEGE LIFE IS SEL­DOM THE RE­AL­ITY. THE MA­JOR­ITY OF COL­LEGE FRESH­MEN EN­TER HERE PIC­TUR­ING AN EASY, FUN­FILLED RIDE.

For beau­ti­ful eyes, look for the good in oth­ers; for beau­ti­ful lips, speak only words of kind­ness; and for poise, walk with the knowl­edge that you are never alone.

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