HERO­INE

In­pur­suit­ofher.

Woman's Era - - News - Ar­jun Mukher­jee

“What’s right about her, first you tell me,” Ashish asked back. “Achi

khasi to hai,” his dad re­ally couldn’t fig­ure out. To be hon­est, she was re­ally beau­ti­ful. “To start with, she doesn’t have cam­era sense.” Ashish is the quin­tes­sen­tial Ben­gali good boy with oiled hair and no bad habits. Till a cer­tain age he has con­cen­trated only on his stud­ies.

Ashish is the quin­tes­sen­tial Ben­gali good boy with oiled hair and no bad habits. Till a cer­tain age he has con­cen­trated only on his stud­ies; post crack­ing ev­ery en­trance test that you can imag­ine. He went for the pres­ti­gious engi­neer­ing course from one of In­dia’s lead­ing col­leges. Four years later he got job of­fers from across the coun­try but he had to set­tle in Kolkata only.

Once he got the job of his choice, he thought now he had the free­dom of liv­ing life the way he wanted and by free­dom he meant only from girls. Yes, girls were a strict no no for him. His fa­ther once caught him chat­ting up with a sweet-look­ing girl in the lo­cal­ity when he was in class six. That day re­turn­ing home he got the thrash­ing of his life. Later he was ad­vised that he will get am­ple chances for rang raliyan, but if he let his mind wan­der now he will have to re­gret it all his life. Ashish was an obe­di­ent son and sin­cerely be­lieved you should al­ways lis­ten to your par­ent’s ad­vice, for they know what is best for you. From then till now he strictly avoided girls.

But what about the hor­monal mad­ness his body was go­ing through. Well he kept them sa­ti­ated by watch­ing the beau­ti­ful hero­ines of Hindi movies. He was fas­ci­nated by them, the way they danced, the way they sang, the way they dressed and fought with the en­tire world for their lover. Now that he had a job of his own he thought that the trans­for­ma­tion from the vir­tual to real world will be ac­cept­able. Alas, it was not to be so. “First, have a solid foun­da­tion,” his fa­ther ad­vised yet again. Yes, he will have the chance to in­ter­act with girls now but five years down the line he can get some­one much bet­ter. “As beau­ti­ful as the hero­ines you fan­ta­sise about,” his fa­ther struck the right chord.

t was enough mo­ti­va­tion to slog for 12 hours a day and by the next six years he had his own flat and own car. “Now can I be with some­one I like and ad­mire,” Ashish de­manded. His mother smiled, “What do you think, we don’t care about you? Look at this photo.” “What photo?” Ashish was dis­gusted. He was handed over the pho­to­graph of a girl. “Who is she?” Ashish very well

re­alised where they were go­ing to. “Could be your wife,” his dad told him. “Not for a for­tune will I marry this girl,” Ashish re­tal­i­ated. “Why, she is so pretty, so fair, has such long tresses.” “She is dumb,” Ashish an­swered back. “Well, we know the best for you, 10 years down the line you will thank us, “his dad was again in an ad­vis­ing mood.” To hell with your ad­vice, I am not mar­ry­ing her and that is fi­nal.” Ashish was ab­so­lutely stub­born. “What’s wrong with her, tell me,” his mom chal­lenged him. “What’s right about her, first you tell me,” Ashish asked back. “Achi khasi to hai,” his dad re­ally couldn’t fig­ure out. To be hon­est, she was re­ally beau­ti­ful. “To start with, she doesn’t have cam­era sense.” “Cam­era sense,” his par­ents had no idea what he meant. “Any­one can make out she is pos­ing for the cam­era.” “Well, if she is pos­ing for the cam­era, what’s wrong with thats.” “No, it should be a side glance, she should be nat­u­ral not let the cam­era af­fect her.” “What is he say­ing?” Ashish’s mom had no clue. His dad shrugged his shoul­ders to im­ply his ig­no­rance. “Now the next point, she doesn’t have that pain in her eyes. Will she be able to sing sad songs?” Ashish was con­vinced he had made his point. “Why will she sing sad songs af­ter her mar­riage?” his dad was con­fused. “Okay, next, where is the naugh­ti­ness in her smile?” Ashish’s dad turned to­wards his mom and said, “Is your son mad?” “Next, can she dance in the rain, bet she can’t dance at all,” Ashish went on. “You want a dancer or a wife?” “You won’t un­der­stand – she doesn’t have the charm like them.” “Like whom? Do you like some­one?” his mom asked. “No mom, I meant like the hero­ines.” “Good­ness me,” Ashish’s mom started cry­ing, “My son is dat­ing a hero­ine.” “Who is she? Ka­t­rina or Deepika?” his dad asked. “You are not get­ting it dad. Deepika, Ka­t­rina, Alia, Anushka they are all the best. I am in love with the essence of our Hindi film hero­ines. “Don’t waste your time search­ing for a bride for him,” his dad told his mom, “search for a good psy­chi­a­trist in­stead.” “You won’t un­der­stand, dad,” Ashish knew he was wast­ing his time. “Get out,” it was too much for him.

Ashish has pa­tiently waited for his hero­ine for al­most two decades, some­one who will sing sad songs when she will miss him, some­one who will dance with him in the rains, whose one smile will make a thou­sand hearts flut­ter, some­one who will take up ri­valry with the en­tire world for him. He was not will­ing to let go on his dreams which he held onto for so long and marry just an­other girl. His hero­ine is def­i­nitely some­where in this wide world.

Nilo­pher was Ashish’s only girl­friend, as the only friend who hap­pened to be a girl. He knew her from his engi­neer­ing days and they shared a good ca­ma­raderie. Ini­tially she was taken aback. “Well, I don’t think Hindi film hero­ines re­ally ex­ist off- screen but since you are adamant for one, why not start com­ing to our week­end par­ties? Ev­ery week guys and girls flock in, we have real fun. I can’t prom­ise you a hero­ine but you def­i­nitely will be able to hang out with new peo­ple and have loads of fun.” “Sounds good,” said Ashish. “It is a house party, so every­body brings some­thing; I’ll let you know what you will have to bring.”

So the next Satur­day Ashish was at Nilo­pher’s place much be­fore time. “Gosh you are real early! I am get­ting ready, have a seat.” Ashish had no idea what a house party meant, so de­cided to check it out. The hall was force­fully va­cated apart from a mu­sic sys­tem with speak­ers, and the fancy lights above con­firmed that there will be mu­sic and dance for sure. Of the re­main­ing two rooms one was trans­formed into a mini­bar while the other into a din­ing place. “Did you bring the whiskey?” Nilo­pher walked out all dressed. “But of course, hey you look so dif­fer­ent.” Nilo­pher was not in her reg­u­lar busi­ness suits, in­stead she was in a hot skirt and a cleav­agere­veal­ing top. “Hey, you can’t stare like this,” warned Nilo­pher, “All the girls will be like this only.” “Why,

Nilo­pher was not in her reg­u­lar busi­ness suits, in­stead she was in a hot skirt and a cleav­age-re­veal­ing top. “Hey, you can’t stare like this,” warned Nilo­pher, “All the girls will be like this only.” Ashish de­manded. His mother smiled, “What do you think, we don’t care about you? Look at this photo.” “What photo,” Ashish was dis­gusted. He was handed over the pho­to­graph of a girl. “Who is she?” Ashish very well re­alised where they were go­ing to. “Could be your wife,” his dad told him.

you brought such an ex­pen­sive brand that too three in­stead of two, your poi­son?” she asked. “I don’t drink,” Ashish said. “Then?” “Then what. Peo­ple will en­joy. Have a good time, don’t worry I can af­ford,” Ashish told her. “I know you can, the bright­est stu­dent of our col­lege, but that you wanted to make oth­ers happy is so very spe­cial,” Nilo­pher said.

In an hour it was a full house. It was a new world for Ashish, he had not seen nor imag­ined such prox­im­ity be­tween girls and boys. They were all well-dressed, well main­tained and looked fresh. He was the odd one out with his tired, bor­ing looks and of­fi­cial at­tire. All of a sud­den, Nilo­pher an­nounced, “it’s the time to disco.” Ashish was the only spec­ta­tor as they danced to re­cent hit num­bers. Ev­ery­one was good in their own way, but Ashish’s eyes were stuck on the girl in red. She wore the short­est skirt and had the hottest body and she danced like heaven. The way she siz­zled and jigged she was burn­ing the dance floor. She knew all the right steps, she got all the moves. She was not a stereo­type. She was tall, dusky and full-fig­ured, had thick hair with a broad face. At times her deep- necked top re­vealed too much, her skirt went well up her thighs, but she was too en­grossed to no­tice it.

About an hour or so later Nilo­pher an­nounced that food is served. “Those who want to con­tinue, can carry on but those in a hurry can have their din­ner.” Ashish checked the watch, well past 10, can’t af­ford to stay any longer.

Ashish was half way through his din­ner when the lady in red walked in with a glass in her hand. She didn’t waste her time on any­thing but prawns and walked straight to­wards him. “Mind if I sit here,” she asked. “Not at all,” he said ner­vously. “Since you can’t take your eyes away from me through­out the night, I de­cided to join you to save you from em­bar­rass­ment,” she said ca­su­ally. “If you wear such a short dress with such a body, any­one will stare at you,” Ashish replied strongly. She looked up, “Do you know that guy there.” She pointed to a mus­cu­lar guy who was so full of mus­cles that it seemed like his Tshirt will rip off any mo­ment. “He is my boyfriend. The other night in the disco a guy was try­ing to act funny with me. He got mad and slapped him so tight that even now he is sport­ing a red cheek.” Ashish was quiet. “Bol do,” she leaned for­ward and said softly. “What,” Ashish asked her. “What you told me just now.” “Bol do,” Ashish an­swered calmly. “Okay,” she said as she got up, “I guess you re­alise what will fol­low.” Ashish was not one to be afraid. She walked to­wards him, in be­tween she stopped and turned, “Don’t run away.” “Swear on you, I won’t,” he an­swered. She went straight up to her mom and whis­pered some­thing in his ears. He hastily walked to­wards Ashish. Ashish was won­der­ing what ex­cuse he would make for his red cheek, when he said, “I am so sorry. Through­out the night I was won­der­ing way you were tres­pass­ing on my girl, but now I got it, you were ad­mir­ing my body,” he said proudly. “Al­ways wanted to have a body like that,” Ashish had to be in­stant. “Not to worry, dude, here take some tips,” Fif­teen min­utes later as he fin­ished Ashish looked to­wards her. She winked and went away. “What a girl,” Ashish mur­mured. “Found your hero­ine,” Nilo­pher was spy­ing on him. “What? Not so eas­ily. Any­way she is go­ing steady.” “Joanna and steady, at best her re­la­tion­ships last for a few months and news for you this one is three and a half a months down, never know next week she may turn up sin­gle.” (To be con­tin­ued) Great men are al­ways of a na­ture orig­i­nally melan­choly.

“Since you can’t take your eyes away from me through­out the night, I de­cided to join you to save you from em­bar­rass­ment,” she said ca­su­ally. “If you wear such a short dress with such a body any­one will stare at you,” Ashish replied strongly. Ev­ery­one was good in their own way, but Ashish’s eyes were stuck on the girl in red. She wore the short­est skirt and had the hottest body and she danced like heaven.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from India

© PressReader. All rights reserved.