Malapropism

A hi­lar­i­ous mis­un­der­stand­ing.

Woman's Era - - Short Story - By Con­jee­varam J. Nan­daku­mar

an­dan was a de­light­ful, in­ef­fec­tual young man with a per­fect pro­file but with no ac­com­plish­ment. He had been into var­i­ous pro­fes­sions and tried his for­tune, but time and for­tune had favoured him not even once. He fi­nally took to teach­ing pro­fes­sion as an English teacher and thought it was his ac­tual cup of tea though he wasn’t re­ally qual­i­fied for the job though he had a pro­found knowl­edge of English. He joined a very small and ob­scure school, but was un­der­paid. Nan­dan glee­fully took the job since English was his pas­sion.

Things were not so com­fort­able for Nan­dan, par­tic­u­larly the cor­re­spon­dent of the school had a very poor knowl­edge of English and was a hor­ri­ble or­a­tor. But ev­ery day he used to be in the lime­light dur­ing the as­sem­bly ses­sion and de­liv­ered speech in English to the chil­dren and the staff, un­mind­ful of whether they like it or not. When­ever Nan­dan of­fered him as­sis­tance he snubbed him and never al­lowed him on the stage to ad­dress the chil­dren for fear of him be­ing side­lined and his poor knowl­edge in English ex­posed to oth­ers. Nan­dan thought no­body in his school was pre­pared to bell the cat to in­form him about his fol­lies and if he goes un­re­strained only the chil­dren would be af­fected. So, he kept his fin­gers crossed and was wait­ing for a ripe mo­ment.

A cou­ple of months later the cor­re­spon­dent of the school de­cided to cel­e­brate the school an­nual day func­tion and he has in­tended to in­vite a re­tired judge of the Madras High Court as chief guest. Ev­ery­body knew that the cor­re­spon­dent would act as a master of cer­e­monies to ex­hibit his English knowl­edge to the vis­i­tors and as ex­pected, Nan­dan was side­lined and the an­nual day pro­gramme was en­trusted to the prin­ci­pal of the school and she pre­pared the agenda for the an­nual day pro­gramme. She chose Naren, a 10th stan­dard boy to of­fer the vote of thanks. The boy suf­fered from dys­lexia, but still the prin­ci­pal wanted to prove that she can train even a dyslexic boy to

de­liver a speech. She

Cor­re­spon­dent of the school had a very poor knowl­edge of English and was a hor­ri­ble or­a­tor. But ev­ery day he used to be in the lime­light dur­ing the as­sem­bly ses­sion and de­liv­ered speech in English to the chil­dren and the staff un­mind­ful of whether they like it or not. Fi­nally the day ar­rived. The cor­re­spon­dent with pomp and fancy took over the mike and started to ad­dress the gath­er­ing. He spoke with ter­ri­ble in­to­na­tion and ac­cent.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from India

© PressReader. All rights reserved.