In The Womb of Si­lence...

The em­bryo of un­spo­ken love.

Woman's Era - - Short Story - By Geeta Kashyap

I alone face this part of him ev­ery day. I have al­ways ques­tioned it, whether it is nat­u­ral and nor­mal to treat one’s life part­ner shab­bily, tak­ing her for granted, treat­ing her as noth­ing more than an ob­ject to sat­isfy car­nal de­sires or just as a re­pro­duc­tive ma­chine.

“Dreams…are in­vari­ably seek­ing to ex­press some­thing that the ego does not know and does not un­der­stand.” – Carl Jung “What hap­pened, love? You are tense. What is both­er­ing you?” I hugged her tightly and mum­bled,”jenny, Re­vant will be back shortly and then we may not be able to meet like this. We have to end our af­fair be­fore …” Jenny cut my speech in the mid­dle. “Love, if you can’t live with him, di­vorce him. We can live to­gether hap­pily. Let us bring up De­vansh to­gether.”

We pas­sion­ately ex­plored each other’s bod­ies bring­ing out in­tense plea­sure. I arched my body sup­port­ing my­self on one hand and played with Jenny’s curly mop of hair with the other hand as we made love. Beads of per­spi­ra­tion, sat­is­fied moans and smiles in­di­cated our hap­pi­ness. Even as I lay in bed with Jenny, hap­pily ex­hausted, I couldn’t help com­par­ing Jenny with Re­vant.

Jenny is the aer­o­bics in­struc­tor at the gym, which I had joined four months ago to shed my post-preg­nancy weight. She is my age and she is an ab­so­lutely sim­ple and prac­ti­cal girl. Our at­trac­tion was mu­tual and in a mo­ment of mad­ness, I had sur­ren­dered to my pas­sion. Our love was hid­den well from so­ci­ety’s pry­ing eyes. Jenny un­der­stood all my spo­ken as well as un­spo­ken thoughts and loved me for who I was. To us lov­ing and car­ing with­out any sort of pre­tences was most im­por­tant. Ours was a love be­tween two equals, nour­ish­ing mind and body with­out any ego has­sles or both­er­a­tions. Jenny’s love had made me calm and peace­ful.

My hus­band Re­vant is hand­some, ed­u­cated, rich … but there has been al­ways a cer­tain un­spo­ken dis­tance be­tween us. His ap­proach is that of an en­ti­tle­ment and his love is cen­tred more on his hap­pi­ness and plea­sure, than mine. Ours, like mil­lions of oth­ers, is a re­la­tion­ship where the two sexes com­pete in­stead of com­ple­ment. Ac­tu­ally, Re­vant isn’t all that bad; he has a soft side too. He is a good provider, good son and son-in-law. When my fa­ther was ill, Re­vant had sup­ported my par­ents in ev­ery way. My par­ents are very proud of him. But …I find Re­vant’s chau­vin­ism and dom­i­nance ab­so­lutely suf­fo­cat­ing.

Ialone face this part of him ev­ery day. I have al­ways ques­tioned it, whether it is nat­u­ral and nor­mal to treat one’s life part­ner shab­bily, tak­ing her for granted, treat­ing her as noth­ing more than an ob­ject to sat­isfy car­nal de­sires or just as a re­pro­duc­tive ma­chine. Why can’t men sup­port their part­ners, recog­nis­ing and en­cour­ag­ing their in­tel­lec­tual po­ten­tial or

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