SEX AND TEENAGERS

Ex­per­i­ment­ing with lim­ited knowl­edge.

Woman's Era - - Contents - Rimli Bhat­tacharya

Sex is a fas­ci­nat­ing sub­ject be­cause of the strong feel­ings in­volved, be­cause of its po­ten­tial for plea­sure, and be­cause of the deeply held cul­tural beliefs sur­round­ing sex. In this es­say, I ex­plain the sub­ject of sex and teenagers, cause and ef­fect. Tech­ni­cal de­tails of sex­ual in­ter­ac­tions are un­nec­es­sary for a gen­eral dis­cus­sion of moral­ity and are not dis­cussed here.

Sex­u­ally ac­tive teenagers are a sig­nif­i­cant prob­lem we must look at. A ques­tion that rings in the minds of teenagers ev­ery­where is when to have sex. Our so­ci­ety in­structs us to wait un­til one is in a lov­ing mar­riage to have sex. Not only is the so­ci­ety preach­ing ab­sti­nence, but now pub­lic schools are also teach­ing stu­dents on the ad­van­tages of ab­sti­nence. Premarital sex is a grow­ing and im­por­tant is­sue. Premarital sex is usu­ally the cause of sex­u­ally trans­mit­ted dis­eases, teen preg­nancy, and deep emo­tions of re­gret.

It’s been ob­served teenagers love ex­per­i­ment­ing with sex­ual ac­tiv­i­ties more and more to­day than ever be­fore. Ac­cord­ing to Charles Krautham­mer, “Sex oozes from ev­ery pore of the cul­ture and there’s not a kid in the world who can avoid it”. Teenagers are sur­rounded by some sort of sex­ual con­no­ta­tions all the time. Whether it is tele­vi­sion, ra­dio, school, or even the In­ter­net, teenagers are hear­ing the ef­fects of sex in our so­ci­ety. The price that teenagers pay for be­ing sex­u­ally ac­tive greatly out­weighs any ad­van­tages. The pe­riod of pu­berty oc­curs some­where be­tween the ages of 10 and 14 for most but can vary for dif­fer­ent peo­ple. Hered­ity, health prob­lems, and emo­tional and phys­i­cal stress can cause these vari­a­tions.

THE BE­GIN­NING

Teens be­gin to ex­per­i­ment with the op­po­site sex by hug­ging, kiss­ing and other forms of sex­ual ex­pres­sion. Teens are ca­pa­ble of cre­at­ing ba­bies as soon as pu­berty be­gins. Teens also watch more tele­vi­sion and lis­ten to more mu­sic de­vel­op­ing their own unique per­son­al­i­ties. In the movies or on tele­vi­sion, the ac­tors and ac­tresses make sex look easy, fun and glam­orous. It ap­pears to be some­thing every­one is do­ing. On tele­vi­sion shows like Daw­son’s

Creek, sex is usu­ally the ma­jor topic of the en­tire show.

Whether it is guys and girls, guys and guys, girls and girls, or mul­ti­ple per­sons for each sex, the sex act it­self is a ma­jor con­flict. Movies, such as Cruel In­ten­tions, por­tray sex as a game. The main char­ac­ters are plac­ing bets on each other that one of them will have sex with some girl who is against the idea of premarital sex. That movie is rated R, but lit­tle kids were in there with their par­ents. Those types of movies are not meant for a young au­di­ence. Now those kids might end up hav­ing sex when they be­come teenagers. Those same teenagers might of­ten be the ones that get preg­nant. Teenage preg­nancy hap­pens so of­ten that peo­ple hardly even recog­nise it any­more as a neg­a­tive ef­fect on our so­ci­ety.

Sex­u­ally trans­mit­ted dis­eases flour­ish in a so­ci­ety of premarital sex, where teens have mul­ti­ple sex part­ners. A di­rect re­sult of these is STDS are be­com­ing more abun­dant among the pop­u­la­tion. One rea­son for the plague of STDS is the mis­use of con­tra­cep­tives by teens. Many teens be­lieve that con­doms, or the pill, pro­hibit the spread of her­pes, AIDS, or other dis­eases, but in fact, they do not stop the spread, and nowhere do the prod­ucts state that they do stop the spread of STDS.

Three mil­lion new cases of sex­u­ally trans­mit­ted dis­eases among teens are re­ported each year. Many teens that be­lieve noth­ing is wrong in com­mit­ting premarital sex have in­ter­course with many dif­fer­ent teens through the ages of 15 and 19, and in­crease the chance of spread­ing sex­u­ally trans­mit­ted dis­eases each time. With sex­ual in­ter­course on the rise with high school stu­dents, and its ac­cep­tance among the pub­lic, even

NOT ONLY IS THE SO­CI­ETY PREACH­ING AB­STI­NENCE, BUT NOW PUB­LIC SCHOOLS ARE ALSO TEACH­ING STU­DENTS ON THE AD­VAN­TAGES OF AB­STI­NENCE. PREMARITAL SEX IS A GROW­ING AND IM­POR­TANT IS­SUE. PREMARITAL SEX IS USU­ALLY THE CAUSE OF SEX­U­ALLY TRANS­MIT­TED DIS­EASES, TEEN PREG­NANCY, AND DEEP EMO­TIONS OF RE­GRET.

TEENS MAY FEEL THE RE­GRET WHEN THEIR PART­NER BREAKS UP WITH THEM, OR RE­ALISE LATER THAT THEY BOTH DO NOT WANT THE SAME THINGS OUT OF THE RE­LA­TION­SHIP. PREMARITAL SEX IS A GREAT CAUSE OF DE­PRES­SION IN TEENS AND EVEN ADULTS WHO RE­FLECT ON THEIR YOUTH­FUL CHOICES.

more teens are hav­ing sex now, to the point that ev­ery 11 sec­onds a teen has sex for their first time. Seventy per cent of these stu­dents say they were so­cially pres­sured into hav­ing sex. If so­ci­ety has the power to pres­sur­ing teens to have sex, so­ci­ety ought to use that power to ed­u­cate teens about the dan­gers of premarital sex.

Sex be­fore mar­riage has also been one of the ma­jor causes of teen preg­nancy. Teens of­ten think that preg­nancy just can­not hap­pen to them, yet teen preg­nancy grows each year, and shows no stop. Care­less­ness is the sig­nif­i­cant fac­tor in teen preg­nancy, whether the care­less­ness is in con­tra­cep­tive use, or choos­ing of a part­ner. Teens just use dif­fer­ent forms of con­tra­cep­tives and birth con­trol in­cor­rectly. Teens, in most cases, do not have the ma­tu­rity to choose a life part­ner at their age, and choose wrong, end­ing up in wrong re­sults such as an un­planned preg­nancy.

Many of un­planned preg­nan­cies hap­pen be­cause of the lack of knowl­edge. Some teenagers just do not re­alise ei­ther how easy it is to be­come preg­nant, or how to cor­rectly use birth con­trol meth­ods. Some other teens ac­tu­ally be­lieve they are in love and ac­tu­ally plan to have a baby, but do not have knowl­edge of the fi­nances in­volved. Thirty per cent of un­planned preg­nan­cies in­volve teen par­ents. Premarital sex makes teen preg­nancy a grow­ing con­cern for all, es­pe­cial par­ents.

EMO­TION IN MO­TION

Lastly, premarital sex can be a great emo­tional fac­tor in teens’ lives. Many teens feel deep, emo­tional re­gret with their in­volve­ment in early in­ter­course. Some teens may not feel the emo­tional re­gret now, but when time goes by and long-term ef­fects start to be recog­nised, ei­ther by their un­planned chil­dren, or by dis­eases, the re­gret can hit with de­pres­sion or low self-es­teem. In fact, a great num­ber of teens, ac­tive in sex­ual re­la­tion­ships, and 90 per cent ac­tu­ally re­gret their ear­lier choice to have sex. Teens may feel the re­gret when their part­ner breaks up with them, or re­alise later that they both do not want the same things out of the re­la­tion­ship. Premarital sex is a great cause of de­pres­sion in teens and even adults who re­flect on their youth­ful choices.

Sex­ual re­la­tions among teens are a grow­ing prob­lem, not only for the teens and pos­si­bly their chil­dren, but also for so­ci­ety as a whole. Premarital sex has been the cause of teen preg­nancy, sex­u­ally trans­mit­ted dis­eases, and feel­ings of re­gret, all ter­ri­ble things that no one should have to go through, and the as­ton­ish­ing fact is that no one has to go through these events, if only they could have pro­longed those few min­utes of bliss for mar­riage.

As for the adults, they can be more in­for­ma­tive for all teens about the dan­gers of premarital sex, and should pay more at­ten­tion to this large prob­lem. If this is done, than the ef­fects of premarital sex could be recog­nised by teens and all who lis­ten, and to the moral­ity be­hind it. In ac­tu­al­ity, the only way to not be af­fected by these life-chang­ing events is to prac­tise sex­ual ab­sti­nence. Many teens claim, how­ever, that ab­sti­nence is ridicu­lous and im­pos­si­ble, yet mil­lions of peo­ple do it and it only takes one word, “no”, to achieve.

I leave the nar­ra­tion but with a mes­sage, “Sex is an emo­tion in mo­tion, there’s this il­lu­sion ho­mo­sex­u­als have sex and het­ero­sex­u­als fall in love, that’s un­true, every­one wants to be loved. You re­ally need to have faith in your­self to make sex an art and stand up for what you be­lieve in, since your mother is not a les­bian, she’s just a re­ally, re­ally bad het­ero­sex­ual.”

A gen­tle­men is one who never strikes a woman with­out provo­ca­tion.

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