SMOK­ING DUR­ING PE­RIOD CAUSES MORE CRAMP

Stub it out.

Woman's Era - - Contents - Binita Maity

AC­CORD­ING TO MED­I­CAL STUD­IES, WOMEN, WHO ARE CHAIN SMOK­ERS, EN­COUNTER WORSE PMS THAN THOSE WHO DON’T. SMOK­ING CAN HEIGHTEN THE RISK OF PRO­LONGED PAINFUL PE­RI­ODS. THIS EX­CRU­CI­AT­ING CRAMP ESCALATES THE NUM­BERS OF CIG­A­RETTES A WOMAN SMOKES IN A DAY.

In our busy sched­ule and hec­tic life­style, smok­ing has now be­come a norm to­day ir­re­spec­tive of gen­der. It is pre­sumed that smok­ing can dwin­dle the stress, but the ques­tion is how much can it lessen the stress? Def­i­nitely, there lies no guar­an­tee but has the war­ranty of ovu­la­tion at­tack. Smok­ing is highly re­spon­si­ble for the fluc­tu­a­tion of hor­mones lev­els that reg­u­late the men­strual cy­cle. Re­cently, light smok­ing is ex­tend­ing to a vogue among young women that is haz­ardous to health. Light smok­ing can in­crease the risk of health prob­lems that worsen PMS, ir­reg­u­lar pe­ri­ods, cervix can­cer and so on.

Ac­cord­ing to med­i­cal stud­ies, women, who are chain smok­ers, en­counter worse PMS than those who don’t. Smok­ing can heighten the risk of pro­longed painful pe­ri­ods. This ex­cru­ci­at­ing cramp escalates the num­bers of cig­a­rettes a woman smokes in a day. How smok­ing be­comes in­ju­ri­ous to health does not de­pends on the num­ber of cig­a­rettes a woman takes, but upon her age which is par­tic­u­larly im­por­tant.

The risk of de­vel­op­ing se­vere PMS tends to in­crease with those women who be­gan smok­ing dur­ing ado­les­cence and young adult­hood. It is proved that smok­ing af­fects the whole range of dif­fer­ent bod­ily func­tions. Stud­ies have no­ticed that in pre-menopausal women, smok­ers have el­e­vated lev­els of es­tro­gen, pro­ges­terone, and var­i­ous an­dro­gens. Smok­ing has been sug­gested to in­crease testos­terone pro­duc­tion in women which may lead to higher fat ac­cu­mu­la­tion around the hip and waist. Th­ese hor­mones are badly in­flu­enced by smok­ing. Oe­stro­gen and pro­ges­terone are closely linked to each other which start and end the men­strual cy­cle.

Re­searchers from the ‘Uni­ver­sity of Mass­a­chu­setts in Amherst’ ob­served, “Ci­garette smok­ing may plau­si­bly in­flu­ence the de­vel­op­ment of PMS through its ef­fect on oe­stro­gen, pro­ges­terone, an­dro­gen, and go­nadotropin lev­els.” Women who smoke en­counter shorter and more ir­reg­u­lar men­strual cy­cle. Ac­tu­ally, smok­ing re­duces the amount of oxy­gen sup­ply to the uterus and con­stricts the blood ves­sels, which makes the pe­riod pain worse. Nico­tine car­ries with it nu­mer­ous neg­a­tive health con­se­quences.

Ac­cord­ing to the Cen­ters for Dis­ease Con­trol and Preven­tion (CDC), smok­ing is re­spon­si­ble for 480,000 deaths every year in the US. Most of the smok­ers in Amer­ica are more ad­dicted to nico­tine than any other drug. Smok­ing af­fects prac­ti­cally every phase of con­cep­tion. Women smok­ers have a greater risk of not ovu­lat­ing and who re­ceive in vitro fer­til­i­sa­tion is less likely to be suc­cess­ful. Nico­tine in­ter­feres with the func­tion of the fal­lop­ian tube and can hin­der an egg from trav­el­ling to the uterus that can lead to an ec­topic or tubal preg­nancy. Re­searchers from the Uni­ver­sity of Pitts­burgh School Of Medicine ex­am­ined that women who quit smok­ing dur­ing the first two weeks of their cy­cle un­dergo less se­vere dif­fi­cul­ties than those who quit dur­ing the lat­ter half of their pe­ri­ods. It is re­ally hard for chain smok­ers to quit smok­ing sud­denly, but new re­search shows that if women try to quit smok­ing dur­ing their pe­ri­ods, they are more likely to suc­ceed. We

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