“THE GATE­WAY TO 21ST CEN­TURY IN­DONE­SIA.”

Celebrate Indonesia - - YOUR INDONESIA CITY GUIDE -

CO­OR­DI­NATES

6°12’S 106°49’E

CITY AR­EAS

661.5KM2

POP­U­LA­TIONS

10,199,700

AREA CODES

(+62) 21 Lo­cated on the north coast of Java, Jakarta is the cap­i­tal city of the Re­pub­lic of In­done­sia. With over 10 mil­lion in­hab­i­tants, it is one of the world’s big­gest and busiest cities and the largest in South­east Asia by pop­u­la­tion. In­cluded in the de­mo­graphic is the en­tire sprawl­ing metropoli­tan area of Ja­bodetabek (Jakarta, Bo­gor, De­pok, Tangerang and Bekasi), the pop­u­la­tion of which ex­ceeds 25 mil­lion, larger than the whole of Aus­tralia. The city traces its roots to Sunda Ke­lapa, a bustling port town on the north­ern coast known to have ex­isted since at least the 15TH cen­tury and which today is still home to Jakarta’s tra­di­tional har­bour. Fu­elled by the boom­ing spice trade, the port ex­panded quickly and soon be­came part of the new city of Batavia. With the ar­rival of traders from Bri­tain, Por­tu­gal and the in­creased in­flu­ence of mer­chants from In­dia and the Mid­dle East, Batavia be­came a mag­net for Chi­nese and other mi­grants from around mod­ern In­done­sia, who fu­elled not only pop­u­la­tion growth but gen­er­ated great wealth. As Batavia pros­pered the Dutch con­structed houses and canals, some of which still re­main. It was a melt­ing-pot of dif­fer­ent In­done­sian eth­nic groups, mi­grants and traders and was reg­u­larly mired in both lo­cal and in­ter­na­tional con­flict. Dur­ing the Sec­ond World War, the oc­cu­py­ing Ja­panese re­named the city Jakarta and, in 1950, it was of­fi­cially named cap­i­tal of the newly formed re­pub­lic, five years af­ter the na­tion had pro­claimed in­de­pen­dence. As the gate­way into In­done­sia, Jakarta is con­sid­ered a truly global city and the cap­i­tal of one of the fastest grow­ing economies in the world. Its growth is high­lighted not just in the in­creas­ing num­ber of lux­ury apart­ment blocks, busi­ness sky­scrapers, in­ter­na­tional restau­rants and cars, but with the shift­ing em­pha­sis to­wards in­fras­truc­ture de­vel­op­ment. None are more ob­vi­ous than the ex­pan­sion of Soekarno-hatta In­ter­na­tional Air­port which, in 2016, served 55 mil­lion pas­sen­gers, rank­ing 22ND on the list of the world’s busiest air­ports. Jakarta’s cul­tural rich­ness and dy­namic eco­nomic growth have spawned a city that at­tracts peo­ple from all walks of life. But it re­mains a city of mas­sive con­trasts; the tra­di­tional and the mod­ern, the rich and the poor, the sacral and the worldly of­ten stand side-by-side in this bustling mul­ti­cul­tural metropoli­tan area. Jakarta’s pop­u­la­tion is a mix of widely di­verse eth­nic and cul­tural groups drawn from the sprawl­ing ar­chi­pel­ago of In­done­sia and is a con­stant re­minder of the na­tional motto: Unity in Di­ver­sity.

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