A CALL TO ACTION

WITH NOTES FROM RAF SI­MONS’ RELOCATION TO NEW YORK, THE REVAMP AT HUGO BOSS TO EVEN DONALD TRUMP, THIS SEASON’S NEW YORK FASH­ION WEEK MIGHT JUST BE THE HOTTEST ONE YET

DA MAN - Style - - Report -

Thanks to Raf Si­mons, this year’s New York Fash­ion Week ( NYFW) and New York Fash­ion Week: Men’s ( NYFW: Men’s) is hot­ter than ever. Not only did he present his de­but collection with Calvin Klein at NYFW, he also chose the Big Ap­ple to show­case Raf Si­mon- the- brand’s fall/ win­ter 2017 collection.

But be­fore Raf Si­mons- the- brand show­cased its collection, first came Joseph Ab­boud. His show was held at St. Stephen’s church in Lex­ing­ton Av­enue. The gothic church was def­i­nitely an ideal venue con­sid­er­ing the collection’s dark and mys­te­ri­ous feel with its lav­ish long coats and dark color pal­ette of black, dark grey and dark blue.

As a mat­ter of fact, famed au­thor Edgar Al­lan Poe served as one of the in­spi­ra­tions behind the collection. The de­signer also brought some of the world’s most prom­i­nent models like Sean O’Pry, Brad Kroenig, Brian Shi­man­sky, Gar­rett Neff and To­bias Sorensen to fur­ther am­plify the rugged and masculine al­lure of the collection. “We con­tinue to cel­e­brate the Amer­i­can man, Amer­i­can pro­duc­tion and the masculine in­di­vid­u­al­ity that is in­her­ently Joseph Ab­boud,” ex­plained Joseph Ab­boud-thedesigner about the collection.

Hugo Boss’ BOSS Menswear also managed to ex­ude a sim­i­lar vibe of so­phis­ti­ca­tion and lux­ury. The difference, in this case, was con­text. While the collection from Joseph Ab­boud is more suit­able for a lux­u­ri­ous night out, BOSS Menswear’s collection con­sists of what mod­ern men would wear in and out­side the of­fice. Okay, be­fore you start rolling your eyes at yet an­other in­ter­pre­ta­tion of the so- called mod­ern men, keep in mind that men’s for­mal wear is cur­rently un­der­go­ing mas­sive change away from the traditional grey suit. This is what Ingo Wilts, the brand’s new Chief Brand Of­fi­cer, was trying to do.

Con­sid­er­ing the last time BOSS held a menswear show was back in 2008, roughly nine years ago, ex­pec­ta­tions ran high. A- lis­ters like Zachary Quinto, Miles Teller, Lucky Blue Smith and many more graced the front rows in an­tic­i­pa­tion for Ingo Wilts’ de­but collection.

While the clothes still look clean and op­u­lent, they ap­peared more ver­sa­tile with looser fit­ting, broader shoul­ders and over­sized trousers. The big­gest sur­prise, however, was that there were no dress shirts or ties in the en­tire collection.

An­other brand that marks as a de­but is Raf Si­mons. For his de­but collection in NYFW: Men’s, the de­signer goes all out in pro­fess­ing his love for the Big Ap­ple, sport­ing the iconic “I [ heart] NY” de­sign on a range of sweaters. It came as no sur­prise that the Bel­gian de­signer got quite a warm wel­come from the crowd—which, at the oc­ca­sion, in­cluded stars such as Neil Pa­trick Har­ris, David Burtka and A$ AP Rocky.

True to the de­signer’s ur­ban and fash­ion­for­ward DNA, his fall/win­ter 2017 collection boasted a lot of over­sized de­tails and loose knitwear. The ur­ban look was fur­ther sup­ported with slo­gans like the afore­men­tioned “I [ heart] NY,” “Youth Pro­ject,” “Walk with Me” and so on.

Now, mak­ing a statement through fash­ion is, of course, not un­com­mon. Whether it is through words or de­sign, there is al­ways a mes­sage that each brand is trying to con­vey. Such is the case for John Var­vatos, who closed NYFW: Men’s. This fall, John Var­vatos- the- man designed clothes em­body­ing free- think­ing mil­len­ni­als.

En­ti­tled “Wild at Heart,” his statement was ex­pressed through calf­skin coats, suede jackets, vel­vet tuxe­dos, dou­ble- breasted suits, mo­tor­cy­cle

“IT IS THE COM­ING TO­GETHER OF DIF­FER­ENT CHARACTERS AND DIF­FER­ENT INDIVIDUALS, JUST LIKE AMER­ICA IT­SELF. IT IS THE UNIQUE BEAUTY AND EMOTION OF AMER­ICA”

jackets and fin­ger­less gloves. Whether clean or heav­ily ac­cented with an­i­mal mo­tifs, the pieces were non­cha­lantly cool. You could re­ally feel the re­bel­lious spirit of mil­lenials and their ex­is­ten­sial angst em­a­nat­ing from the collection.

While NYFW: Men’s may have ended after John Var­vatos, new menswear collection con­tin­ued com­ing out at NYFW.

But un­doubt­edly the high­light— and the most an­tic­i­pated— show from both NYFW and NYFW: Men’s was Raf Si­mons’ Calvin Klein. Sim­i­lar to his own epony­mous brand, Si­mons’ work for Calvin Klein’s fall/win­ter 2017 collection was an ode to his new home in the United States of Amer­ica.

“It re­flects the en­vi­ron­ment. All of these dif­fer­ent peo­ple with dif­fer­ent styles and dress codes. It’s the fu­ture, the past, Art Deco, the city, the Amer­i­can West ... all of these things and none of these things,” Si­mons ex­plained. “Not one era, not one thing, not one look. It is the com­ing to­gether of dif­fer­ent characters and dif­fer­ent individuals, just like Amer­ica it­self. It is the unique beauty and emotion of Amer­ica.”

From march­ing band uni­forms to an­tique hand­crafted quilt­ing to jeans, Raf Si­mons of­fers an out­sider’s view of Amer­ica, which is bril­liantly ex­pressed through his Calvin Klein collection. The song that started the show, however, was David Bowie’s “This is Not Amer­ica.”

The song might feel con­tra­dic­tory to the collection, but Si­mons had pub­licly com­mented on the country’s po­lit­i­cal cli­mate and how one should stand up against what’s happening. Care to ven­ture a guess as to what he’s talk­ing about? It’s Donald Trump. From Calvin Klein to the street- savvy brand Public School with its caps and tops in­scribed with slo­gans like “Make Amer­ica New York” and “New Lead­ers,” this season’s NYFW and NYFW: Men’s is the most po­lit­i­cal one yet. New­comer Willy Chavar­ria opened his show with models cramped to­gether in cages to ex­plore themes of op­pres­sion. Business of Fash­ion started a ban­dana move­ment with the hash­tag # tied­to­gether to show sol­i­dar­ity and hu­man unity, and was joined by prom­i­nent designers like Tommy Hil­figer, Philip Lim and Diane Von Fursten­berg.

Jeremy Scott, on the other hand, was on full rage mode. His vibrant collection that fea­tured im­ages of Je­sus, Elvis and Michael Jack­son was a strong statement on idol­a­try. Even more telling was how ev­ery front- of- house worker on his show sported T- shirts with the words “our voice is the only thing that will pro­tect us” on the front and phone num­bers for Se­nate rep­re­sen­ta­tives on the back. It was, quite sim­ply, a call to action.

In hind­sight, this season’s New York Fash­ion Week wasn’t just about fash­ion. It was about mak­ing a stance, about con­vey­ing sup­port, anger, grief and dis­dain to­wards the so­cial and po­lit­i­cal cli­mate of the world. And what is fash­ion if not a way to ex­press your­self ?

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Indonesia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.