SIG­NA­TURE

Harper's Bazaar Art (Indonesia) - - The News -

The pres­ence of the sig­na­ture of the maker en­graved on the bot­tom / back of the jew­elry is sa­cred in de­ter­min­ing the orig­i­nal­ity of an­tique jew­elry. The ex­is­tence of these sig­na­tures may mul­ti­ply the in­vest­ment value of the jew­elry. Given the num­ber of

forged sig­na­tures on paint­ings, the pres­ence of these sig­na­tures is also bet­ter sup­ported by other doc­u­ments.

Here Is THE SUM­MARY of some of THE Tips From THE ex­perts.

MAK­ING TECH­NIQUES

An­tique jew­elry can be iden­ti­fied through the cut­ting and pol­ish­ing of the pre­cious stones that are of­ten ir­reg­u­lar and how the

set­ting is made. Mar­jan sterk rec­om­mends to buy with your heart and also to use com­mon sense. signed pieces are cre­ated by lead­ing jewel­ers and de­sign­ers who cre­ate jew­elry with the high­est level of artistry and tech­nique. Mar­jan sterk also ad­vises to look for un­usual de­sign. The price of jew­ellery from the mid-20th cen­tury is still af­ford­able but some

have be­come iconic pieces. Look for the an­tique of the fu­ture.

Trabert&ho­ef­fer-mauboussin,

retro NY ca 1940 Col­lec­tion of Han­cock, Lon­don. A col­lab­o­ra­tion of Mauboussin paris

with Trabert&ho­ef­fer, NY rené BOIVIN (1864-1917), paris ca 1950. Col­lec­tion of Véronique, Monaco.

TIFFANY & Co. NY ca 1890 Col­lec­tion of Veronique Bamps, Monaco. one of 24 award win­ning orchid brouch col­lec­tions by pauld­ing Farn­ham shown at ex­po­si­tion uni­verselle in paris, 1889.

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