Korsi: Pleas­ant warmth for fam­ily gath­er­ing

Tehran Times - - LIFE -

Not a long time ago, korsi was found in nearly all Ira­nian houses dur­ing cold sea­sons. With the change of life­style, korsi is not a house­ware any­more th­ese days.

In mod­ern houses, tele­vi­sion set is a coun­ter­feit re­place­ment for this lovely piece of fur­ni­ture as they both gather peo­ple around.

How­ever, there is a dis­tinct dif­fer­ence be­tween korsi, which gather fam­ily mem­bers to­gether to so­cial­ize and TV set, which fully and de­struc­tively at­tracts fam­ily mem­bers’ at­ten­tion and stop them from in­ter­act­ing with each other.

What is korsi?

It is a 50 cen­time­ter high our-legged table with a heater un­der­neath it, and blan­kets and com­forters thrown around it.

They dec­o­rate it with a piece of ja­jim or kilim. Some cush­ions and poshti (a kind of cush­ion lean against the wall) are put around korsi. In the past, the heat­ing source was a fire pan in which, the coals are put when fired. Fam­i­lies with lower in­come made a hole be­neath Korsi and put the coals in that. They used the fire as the stove for mak­ing dishes like Ab­gusht as well.

Korsi, heart of Per­sian homes

How­ever Korsi was not a mere heater in Per­sian cul­ture. Its pleas­ant warmth, brought all the fam­ily to­gether. They ate win­ter good­ies and lis­tened to each other. Dur­ing nights, grand­par­ents told sto­ries and nar­ra­tions while all fam­i­lies sat at korsi.

Korsi had a cru­cial part dur­ing Yalda cel­e­bra­tion, which falls on De­cem­ber 20.

The aus­pi­cious yet thou­sands-year-old oc­ca­sion, known as the long­est and dark­est night of the year, marks the last eve of au­tumn and the be­gin­ning of win­ter.

The place of sit­ting for each mem­ber of fam­ily var­ied ac­cord­ing to his or her age. Most of the time the elder mem­ber of fam­ily sat on the top of room, with the most dis­tance from door while chil­dren sat near door.

In af­flu­ent fam­i­lies, there were two ko­r­sis, one in the liv­ing room and another in a

Korsi was not a mere heater in Per­sian cul­ture. Its pleas­ant warmth, brought all the fam­ily to­gether. They ate win­ter good­ies and lis­tened to each other. Dur­ing nights, grand­par­ents told sto­ries and nar­ra­tions while all fam­i­lies sat at korsi.

room for guests.

Ac­cord­ing to Ira­nian tra­di­tional medicine, Korsi is ben­e­fi­cial for ane­mia. Ly­ing your feet be­neath Korsi im­prove your blood cir­cu­la­tion which is ben­e­fi­cial for health.

While your body get warm grad­u­ally es­pe­cially the lower part, it has a great in­flu­ence on your knees and discs.

Korsi in mod­ern time

Korsi still can be an item of fur­ni­ture in mod­ern houses, which cre­ates a cozy place for fam­ily gath­er­ing.

In Ja­pan, they de­sign new mod­els for ko­tatsu, a kind of tra­di­tional Ja­panese table sim­i­lar to korsi. Since many build­ings in Ja­pan lack in­su­la­tion and rooms are heated sep­a­rately, ko­tatsu acts as a handy cen­tral­ized heat source when it’s chilly.

Korsi and ko­tatsu are the means for fam­ily gath­er­ings and face to face talks, in­valu­able con­nec­tions, which are im­por­tant re­gard­less of time and place.

We can be proud of some parts of past time in mu­se­ums but some parts are our her­itage, which is use­ful to­day. Bring back charm of past, with what we in­her­ited from our wise an­ces­tor to our life.

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