France takes Google to court to con­trol con­tent glob­ally

Tehran Times - - TECHNOLOGY -

France is headed to the Euro­pean Court of Jus­tice to es­tab­lish whether it can force com­pa­nies such as Google to de-list search re­sults glob­ally.

France’s data reg­u­la­tor is seek­ing clar­i­fi­ca­tion on whether ma­te­rial re­moved un­der the “right to be for­got­ten” (RTBF) law should only be re­moved within France or if it should be de-listed on ev­ery Google do­main.

RTBF was es­tab­lished in 2014 when a man called Mario Costeja com­plained that search­ing for his name on Google re­turned out-of-date ma­te­rial about an un­set­tled debt and didn’t re­veal that his debt was set­tled.

He won his case, and now the RTBF al­lows or­di­nary peo­ple to de­mand that Google amends its search re­sults and de-lists links to “in­ad­e­quate, ir­rel­e­vant or [...] ex­ces­sive” in­for­ma­tion. Although the ma­te­rial it­self re­mains on­line, it can’t be found through searches us­ing the in­di­vid­ual’s name.

Now, France’s data reg­u­la­tor, the Com­mis­sion Na­tionale de l’In­for­ma­tique et des Lib­ertes (CNIL), is seek­ing to ex­tend this power to al­low it to re­move links from not just google.fr but all Google do­mains.

Google and a group of eight in­ter­na­tional free speech or­gan­i­sa­tions are warn­ing that such an ex­ten­sion could en­cour­age au­thor­i­tar­ian states such as China, Rus­sia and Saudi Ara­bia to sim­i­larly at­tempt to con­trol the global in­ter­net. UK busi­ness­man wins first ‘right to be for­got­ten’ case UK busi­ness­man wins first ‘right to be for­got­ten’ case

The man, named only as NT2 in court, wanted a past crime he com­mit­ted to not come up in search re­sults

Me­dia or­gan­i­sa­tions have also filed a state­ment re­gard­ing the pro­tracted bat­tle be­tween CNIL and Google, ar­gu­ing that the global ap­pli­ca­tion of the RTBF is “in­com­pat­i­ble with fun­da­men­tal rights and free­doms and in­ter­na­tional law”.

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