Lat­vian en­vi­ron­men­tal com­pa­nies launch train­ing course

The Kurdish Globe - - EDITORIAL - By Salih Wal­ad­bagi

Er­bil gover­norate has con­ducted sev­eral train­ing cour­ses with lead­ing en­vi­ron­men­tal Lat­vian com­pa­nies to im­prove en­vi­ron­men­tal con­di­tions. The gover­norate has launched three train­ing cour­ses for a num­ber of Engi­neers, direc­tors and sev­eral other em­ploy­ees. Two train­ing cour­ses were launched in the cap­i­tal city of Er­bil, and the third one was launched in Latvia.

Latvia is one of the three Baltic coun­tries -- Lithua­nia, As­to­nia and Latvia. The po­lit­i­cal sys­tem is an demo­crat­i­cally elected par­lia­ment. The num­ber of its pop­u­la­tion is es­ti­mated to be around 2,240,000 and Latvia be­came an in­de­pen­dent coun­try in 1991 af­ter the fall of the Soviet Union. It be­came a mem­ber of the Euro­pean Union in 2004.

Arta Di­zof­sica is the di­rec­tor of Vin­tico Com­pany which is one of the lead­ing en­vi­ron­men­tal com­pa­nies in Latvia. Di­zof­s­cia came to Kur­dis­tan in 2008, and met with the Min­is­ter of En­vi­ron­ment. He told the min­is­ter that his com­pany is fully ready to co­op­er­ate with the Kur­dis­tan Re­gional Government’s (KRG) rel­e­vant par­ties. He also re­counted that he dis­cov­ered sev­eral his­tor­i­cal sim­i­lar­i­ties be­tween Latvia and the Kur­dis­tan re­gion. He added, “In a very short time af­ter we be­came in­de­pen­dent in 1991, we en­deav­ored hard to be­come a lead­ing coun­try in the world in the field of en­vi­ron­ment sec­tor.”

In 2009, the com­pany launched its first train­ing course, and the min­istry rec­om­mended 37 em­ploy­ees to par­tic­i­pate in the course. Although Di­zof­s­cia has stated that no for­mal agree­ment has been signed be­tween KRG and Vin­tico to launch train­ing cour­ses. In a press con­fer­ence, he told Kur­dish news out­lets that he is happy to de­velop mu­tual re­la­tions with Kur­dis­tan. He said, “There are many pro­fes­sional peo­ple in Kur­dis­tan just like that of Latvia. The cur­rent devel­op­ment in Latvia is the pro­duc­tion of such pro­fes­sional peo­ple, and I hope the same hap­pens in Kur­dis­tan”.

Di­zof­s­cia stated that the train­ers are both qual­i­fied and skilled, adding that one of them was the head of mu­nic­i­pal­ity for three years, as well as a min­is­ter of re­gional devel­op­ment for sev­eral years. Ac­cord­ing to him, his com­pany has tried to teach em­ploy­ees on two level - the­o­ret­i­cal and prac­ti­cal. He be­lieves the peo­ple are re­spon­si­ble for pro­tect­ing Er­bil city, and other cities in Kur­dis­tan from be­ing pol­luted. He ex­plained that “There are many pro­fes­sional peo­ple in Kur­dis­tan just like that of Latvia. The cur­rent devel­op­ment in Latvia is the pro­duc­tion of such pro­fes­sional peo­ple, and I hope the same hap­pens in Kur­dis­tan”.

A view of a nat­u­ral at­trac­tion in Rawan­duz, north of Er­bil.

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