Stop Killing

Iraq High Com­mis­sion for Hu­man Rights con­firmed that the free­dom of be­lief and re­li­gious prac­tice is guar­an­teed in Iraq

The Kurdish Globe - - FRONT PAGE - Salih Wal­ad­bagi

Dur­ing the past weeks the Kur­dish Yezidi mi­nori­ties has faced sev­eral pre­planned ter­ror­ist at­tacks in the Iraqi cap­i­tal, Bagh­dad.

Fol­low­ing the at­tacks the Kur­dish po­lit­i­cal par­ties called on the Iraqi fed­eral govern­ment and the rel­e­vant se­cu­rity par­ties to fur­ther try to halt the ter­ror­ist as­saults on the Yezidis.

Kur­dis­tan Pa­tri­otic Union’s polit­buro of Iraqi Pres­i­dent Jalal Tal­a­bani pub­lished an an­nounce­ment, con­demn­ing the as­saults.

“Dur­ing the past weeks in sev­eral pre­planned as­saults in Bagh­dad sev­eral Kur­dish Yezidis who moved to the city to find job op­por­tu­ni­ties were killed. The num­ber of the mur­dered Yezidis is es­ti­mated to be around 13. Out of which, nine were killed in Al­robeyi Street and four more in Sadr Street. While three more se­verely in­jured,” the an­nounce­ment reads.

The Kur­dish po­lit­i­cal par­ties ex­pressed their condo- lences to the fam­i­lies of the Yezidi vic­tims and called for the Iraqi govern­ment and the se­cu­rity of­fi­cials to find those be­hind the at­tacks and bring them to jus­tice.

In ad­di­tion, the Kur­dish par­ties urged the Iraqi Shialed govern­ment to pro­tect the lives of the Kur­dish Yezidi mi­nori­ties as a con­sti­tu­tional task and en­deavor to pre­vent the rep­e­ti­tion of suck ter­ror­ist at­tacks.

Ac­cord­ing to un­of­fi­cial sta­tis­tics, the num­ber of the Yezidis liv­ing in Bagh­dad is es­ti­mated to be around 3,000.

How­ever, the Yezidi schol­ars in­side Iraq and abroad call for a cam­paign to strongly crit­i­cize and con­demn the at­tacks on the Yezidis.

The Kur­dish po­lit­i­cal par­ties also asked the do­mes­tic and in­ter­na­tional hu­man rights NGOs, es­pe­cially those work­ing for the UN, to put pres­sure on Bagh­dad au­thor­i­ties to save the Yezidis from harm.

Iraqi cabi­net con­demned “the at­tacks”

Fol­low­ing the as­saults, the press depart­ment of the Iraqi cabi­net is­sued an an­nounce­ment, strongly con­demned the at­tacks on the Yezidis hap­pened on 14 May, 2013.

“Iraq High Com­mis­sion for Hu­man Rights ex­presses its con­do­lence to the fam­i­lies of the vic­tims. It will in­ves­ti­gate to learn the aim of tar­get­ing the Yezidi mi­nori­ties in Bagh­dad again. The com­mis­sion also re­con­firmed that the free­dom of be­lief and re­li­gious prac­tice is guar­an­teed in the coun­try,” the state­ment reads.

It also asked the re­li­gious se­nior fig­ures to is­sue a Fatwa [in the Is­lamic faith is the tech­ni­cal term for the le­gal judg­ment] to pro­hibit killing Iraqis from ev­ery re­li­gion, sex, color and eth­nic.

Around 750 thou­sands Yezidis are now liv­ing in Kur­dis­tan Re­gion of Iraq. Yezidis have five feasts dur­ing a year in which they cel­e­brate.

They are con­sid­ered as Kur­dish na­tion and faced ag­gres­sive at­tacks dur­ing con­sec­u­tive Iraqi for­mer re- gimes. Fol­low­ing U.S.-led in­va­sion to Iraq since 2003 they have lived in peace and free­dom gen­er­ally. The ma­jor tem­ple of Yezidis is lo­cated in a moun­tain­ous place called Lal­ish Tem­ple.

Yazid­ian woman, the cry of the vic­tims who have been killed in Bagh­dad. In the north­ern Iraqi city of Mo­sul, on may 16, 2013.

Yazid­ian woman, the cry of the vic­tims who have been killed in Bagh­dad. In the north­ern Iraqi city of Mo­sul, on may 16, 2013.

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