Pre­con­di­tions in ne­go­ti­a­tions to form KRG cab­i­net lead to ex­ter­nal in­ter­fer­ence

Na­tional in­ter­ests have to be con­sid­ered as the ba­sis of ne­go­ti­a­tions to form the new KRG cab­i­net

The Kurdish Globe - - FRONT PAGE -

The Kur­dis­tan Demo­cratic Party (KDP) won the Septem­ber par­lia­men­tary elec­tions and is ex­pected to be­gin ne­go­ti­a­tions with all the po­lit­i­cal par­ties to form the next Kur­dis­tan Re­gional Gov­ern­ment (KRG). Mean­while, politi­cians and col­lege pro­fes­sors be­lieve the set­ting of pre­con­di­tions of any sort by the po­lit­i­cal par­ties might lead to de­lays in the for­ma­tion of the cab­i­net and to in­ter­ven­tion by other coun­tries.

The Kur­dis­tan Demo­cratic Party (KDP) won the Septem­ber par­lia­men­tary elec­tions and is ex­pected to be­gin ne­go­ti­a­tions with all the po­lit­i­cal par­ties to form the next Kur­dis­tan Re­gional Gov­ern­ment (KRG). Mean­while, politi­cians and col­lege pro­fes­sors be­lieve the set­ting of pre­con­di­tions of any sort by the po­lit­i­cal par­ties might lead to de­lays in the for­ma­tion of the cab­i­net and to in­ter­ven­tion by other coun­tries.

Nei­ther the KDP’s cur­rent part­ner (the Pa­tri­otic Union of Kur­dis­tan—PUK), nor any of the op­po­si­tion par­ties (the Change Move­ment—Goran, Kur­dis­tan Is­lamic Union—KIU, and Kur­dis­tan Is­lamic Group— KIG) has an­nounced that they will not par­tic­i­pate in the cab­i­net.

The KDP’s lead­er­ship com­mit­tee met a week ago and ap­pointed Nechir­van Barzani, the cur­rent KRG Prime Min­is­ter, to form the new cab­i­net. He will also lead the KDP’s ne­go­ti­a­tion com­mit­tee, which will talk with the other par­ties on the way to form­ing the cab­i­net.

The prepa­ra­tions for form­ing the cab­i­net come more than 55 days af­ter the leg­isla­tive elec­tions, which were held on Septem­ber 21, and yet the par­ties have still to agree on a mech­a­nism for form­ing the cab­i­net. Post­pone­ment of cab­i­net Mah­moud Os­man, an in­de­pen­dent politi­cian, says the po­lit­i­cal par­ties have been neg­li­gent in their ef­forts to form a cab­i­net, adding that they should have reached an agree­ment so long af­ter the par­lia­men­tary vote.

He also asked: “I won­der why the po­lit­i­cal par­ties have not yet been able to sit down to­gether and talk about the mech­a­nisms for form­ing the cab­i­net.” All they do is is­sue sharply crit­i­cal state­ments about one another.

Mean­while, Omer Nouri­dini, a col­lege pro­fes­sor, be­lieves that the cab­i­net has to be formed soon, and that those par­ties that do not want to par­tic­i­pate in it should stay out of the gov­ern­ment and form the Op­po­si­tion.

He added that the na­tional in­ter­est has to be taken as the ba­sis for ne­go­ti­a­tions be­tween the par­ties. Pre­con­di­tions Each of the three po­lit­i­cal par­ties that served as an op­po­si­tion in the Kur­dis­tan par­lia­ment have their own pre­con­di­tions for par­tic­i­pat­ing in the new cab­i­net. This has be­come a bar­rier ahead of the ne­go­ti­a­tions to form the next cab­i­net.

“The op­po­si­tion groups have al­ways up­held that they will not take part in a meet­ing if the other par­ties at­tend with pre­con­di­tions. But they have pre­con­di­tions them­selves,” said Ab­dul­salam Bar­wari, a for­mer MP in the Kur­dis­tan par­lia­ment.

Another politi­cian says the op­po­si­tion groups had a dif­fer­ent take on the po­lit­i­cal equa­tions, but that this was not a rea­son for lay­ing down pre­con­di­tions be­fore ne­go­ti­at­ing to form the cab­i­net.

He added that the op­po­si­tion par­ties have to put their con­di­tions on the ta­ble in ne­go­ti­a­tions with other par­ties, not pub­lish them in me­dia out­lets be­fore the meet­ings start. He said that neigh­bor­ing coun­tries might in­ter­fere if the po­lit­i­cal par­ties fail to reach an agree­ment. Cab­i­net for­ma­tion The KRG is based in Er­bil, the cap­i­tal of the Kur­dis­tan Re­gion, and cur­rently ad­min­is­ters the gov­er­norates of Er­bil, Su­laimaniya and Duhok. The cur­rent gov­ern­ment, led by PM Barzani, as­sumed of­fice on 5 April 2012.

Ac­cord­ing to Os­man, it would be bet­ter for Kur­dis­tan if the eighth KRG cab­i­net were broad-based in view of the num­ber of cur­rent dis­putes be­tween Er­bil and Bagh­dad as well as with neigh­bor­ing coun­tries.

“If all the po­lit­i­cal par- ties par­tic­i­pate in the new cab­i­net, they will be able to work to­gether to push through the gov­ern­ment’s agenda—some­thing Bagh­dad can­not do,” says Os­man.

Bar­wari be­lieves the Kurds need to be more united than ever, but that this does not mean ev­ery party needs to par­tic­i­pate in the gov­ern­ment.

Gen­eral view of Kur­dis­tan Re­gional Gov­ern­ment’s (KRG) build­ing, Coun­cil of Min­is­ter, in Er­bil, cap­i­tal of fed­eral Kur­dis­tan Re­gion of Iraq.

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