Pol­i­tics and us­ing the cards

The Kurdish Globe - - FRONT PAGE - By Dr. Rawaz M.khosh­naw

In this so-called game of pol­i­tics, it is wise some­times to use all one’s cards, other times they should be kept close to your chest for the right mo­ment, but there are cards that should never be played, be­cause the con­se­quences are cat­a­strophic.

In this so-called game of pol­i­tics, it is wise some­times to use all one’s cards, other times they should be kept close to your chest for the right mo­ment, but there are cards that should never be played, be­cause the con­se­quences are cat­a­strophic.

Since 2003, we as Kurds have con­tin­ued to cling to the prin­ci­ples of con­sen­sus, democ­racy and rev­enue-shar­ing en­shrined in the con­sti­tu­tion. How­ever, most of these lofty ideals have now been stripped of mean­ing. We stress the sanc­tity of the con­sti­tu­tion, though we know other than us no one ac­tu­ally be­lieves in it. Con­sen­sus is just an empty word, par­tic­u­larly over the past 4 years . Democ­racy, we have seen, ef­fec­tively means the dom­i­nance and con­trol of Shi’ates. True part­ner­ship, for them (Shi'ates) means our share and pres­ence in the high level po­si­tions of the state, namely the pres­i­dency, deputy prime min­is­ter, min­is­ter of for­eign af­fairs, and some other min­istries, and we know non of these po­si­tions in to­days Iraq has any in­flu­ence over any­thing for the pri­m­in­is­ters dom­i­nance over ev­ery­thing.

So the in­com­plete and in­suf­fi­cient share of na­tional rev­enue we get is the only true tan­gi­ble tie that binds us to Bagh­dad.

In re­cent years, that tie has be­come the tar­get of many Iraqi politi­cians, es­pe­cially among the Shi’ate na­tional coali­tion, most no­tably State of Law politi­cians, this is the card that should have re­mained un­played, as it is the last re­main­ing brick hold­ing up the pyramid. Re­mov­ing it will bring the whole ed­i­fice down.

The coun­cil of rep­re­sen­ta­tives passed the budget last year in spite of a boy­cott by Kur­dish MPs, and this year with the ap­point­ment of Se­faldin Alsafi a loyal to Malki and Shahrstani as min­is­ter of fi­nance, they have started a new fi­nan­cial tac­tic by de­lay­ing send­ing Kur­dis­tan’s share and con­nect­ing it with the on­go­ing dis­pute over oil and gas rev­enue shar­ing. There is a chance this year’s budget will be passed in sim­i­lar man­ner, with­out Kur­dish MPs present in the voting cham­ber, once again.

These tac­tics and poli­cies of them dont puzzle me in­deed but what puz­zles me is whether we as Kurds have re­ceived the mes­sage or not.

They are ready and will­ing to go down that road and pull the car­pet from un­der the po­lit­i­cal sys­tem's main pil­lars, while we are still us­ing the high-minded rhetoric of a po­lit­i­cal pact that does not ex­ist,

Stuck with the century long quest of what can be done and what can­not, will it hap­pen or not, will it suc­ceed or not, mean­while for­get­ting that pol­i­tics in fact is about mak­ing what can­not be done, done. Isn’t this what they name it pol­i­tics “the art of mak­ing the im­pos­si­ble pos­si­ble”, and as Per­sians cor­rectly de­fine it, “mak­ing the un­make­able”, or “do­ing the un­doable”.

It is time for us to play some un­played cards as well, es­pe­cially with re­gard to the sta­tus of the dis­puted bound­aries.

We have waited too long al­ready and more wait­ing will not make any­thing change on its own.

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