Iraq nom­i­nates IS Yazidi vic­tim Na­dia Mu­rad for No­bel prize

The Kurdish Globe - - FRONT PAGE -

Na­dia Mu­rad Basee Taha, a young Kur­dish Yazidi woman who’ve been held as sex slave by Is­lamic State (IS) and es­caped the clutches of ji­hadi mil­i­tants was of­fi­cially nom­i­nated by Iraq on Tues­day for the No­bel Peace Prize.

Na­dia Mu­rad Basee Taha, a young Kur­dish Yazidi woman who’ve been held as sex slave by Is­lamic State (IS) and es­caped the clutches of ji­hadi mil­i­tants was of­fi­cially nom­i­nated by Iraq on Tues­day for the No­bel Peace Prize.

“We are proud of nom­i­nat­ing this Iraqi girl to re­ceive the No­bel Peace Prize, and we ask the pub­lic opin­ion and as­so­ci­ated or­ga­ni­za­tions to sup­port her be­cause she de­serves to win,” the Iraqi govern­ment said in a state­ment an­nounc­ing the nom­i­na­tion, Ru­daw re­ports.

“She is the sym­bol of women’s strug­gle against the dark forces aim­ing to de­grade women,” read the state­ment.

“Na­dia talked about the plight of Yazidi women ab­ducted by IS, and she asked the in­ter­na­tional com­mu­nity to res­cue a record num­ber of 3,400 Yazidi girls and women from the hands of IS,” it added.

Mu­rad was kid­napped by IS along with thou­sands of other girls and women, when the pre­dom­i­nantly Yazidi city of Sin­jar (Shin­gal) fell to IS in Au­gust 2014.

Mu­rad who shocked the whole world af­ter she es­caped from the cap­tiv­ity of IS group in Iraq and be­ing raped for 3 months. Last De­cem­ber she went out to an­nounce at the plat­form of the UN Se­cu­rity Coun­cil the de­tails of what hap­pened to her and what is hap­pen­ing to those Iraqi Yazidi women at the hands of the IS group.

Is­lamic State group (IS) has ex­tended its con­trol on most parts of Sin­jar (Shin­gal) district, west of Mo­sul on Au­gust 3, 2014 which led thou­sands of Kur­dish fam­i­lies to flee to Mount Sin­jar, where they were trapped in it and suf­fered from sig­nif­i­cant lack of wa­ter and food, killing and ab­duc­tion of thou­sands of Yazidis as well as rape and cap­tiv­ity of thou­sands of women.

Those who stay be­hind are sub­jected to bru­tal, geno­ci­dal acts: thou­sands killed, hun­dreds buried alive, and count­less acts of rape, kid­nap­ping and en­slave­ment are per­pet­u­ated against Yazidi women. To add in­sult to in­jury, IS fight­ers ran­sack and de­stroy an­cient Yazidi holy sites.

Ac­cord­ing to Hu­man Rights or­ga­ni­za­tions, thou­sands of Yazidi Kur­dish women and girls have been forced to marry or been sold into sex­ual slav­ery by the IS ji­hadists. Thou­sands of Yazidi girls still in Is­lamic State cap­tiv­ity, Kur­dish of­fi­cial says.

The United Na­tions has de­scribed the at­tack on the Yazidis as a pos­si­ble geno­cide.

U.S. Demo­cratic pres­i­den­tial can­di­date Hil­lary Clin­ton on Tues­day said that Is­lamic State vi­o­lence against Iraqi Yazidi Kurds and other religious mi­nori­ties in the Middle East was “geno­cide.”.

The Sin­jar town was lib­er­ated from IS group on Novem­ber 13, 2015 by the Iraqi Kur­dish Pesh­merga, Yazidi forces, Kur­dish forces from Syria and Turkey’s PKK forces.

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