Many women ex­pe­ri­ence Breast Pain

Bray People - - LIFESTYLE - YOUR HEALTH WITH DR. MICHELLE COOPER

AT some stage in their life Most women de­velop breast pain, which can vary from mild to se­vere, with treat­ment op­tions in­clud­ing painkillers and top­i­cal anti-in­flam­ma­tory drugs.

Breast pain can be classed as ei­ther ‘cycli­cal’ - where the pain is re­lated to pe­ri­ods, or ‘non cycli­cal’ - where the pain is not pe­riod-re­lated.

Up to seven in 10 women de­velop breast pain at some stage dur­ing their life­time. About two in three cases are cycli­cal.

CYCLI­CAL BREAST PAIN

Cycli­cal breast pain can oc­cur at any age from com­mence­ment of pe­ri­ods, but it is most com­mon be­tween the ages of 30 and 50 years. Oc­cur­ring in breast tis­sue which is more sen­si­tive than usual to hormonal changes, cycli­cal pain is not due to hormonal dis­ease or any prob­lem in the breast it­self.

Symp­toms can be mild and may only be­gin in the days be­fore a pe­riod. How­ever for one in 10 women the pain can be se­vere and may last one to two weeks be­fore a pe­riod. Pain usu­ally eases once the pe­riod ar­rives.

TREAT­MENT OP­TIONS FOR CYCLI­CAL BREAST PAIN

In se­vere in­stances treat­ment op­tions in­clude: * Breast sup­port. A well sup­port­ing, cor­rectly

fit­ted bra can help ease pain. * Painkillers such as parac­eta­mol or ibupro­fen

may help. * Top­i­cal (rub-on) non-steroidal anti-in­flam­ma­tory drugs (NSAID's) such as top­i­cal di­clofenac or ibupro­fen can also help. * Evening prim­rose oil can be taken for at least a four-month pe­riod at a dose of 120-160 mg twice daily. * Con­sider your med­i­ca­tion. Con­tra­cep­tive pills, HRT, anti-de­pres­sants and cer­tain blood pres­sure med­i­ca­tions may be a con­tribut­ing fac­tor.

NON­CYCLI­CAL BREAST PAIN

Un­re­lated to pe­ri­ods, non­cycli­cal breast pain may oc­cur on a reg­u­lar ba­sis or spo­rad­i­cally. Pain may be in one breast or lo­calised to one area, and is most com­mon for women over 40 years. There are var­i­ous causes and con­se­quently med­i­cal as­sess­ment should be sought. In many cases the pain goes away af­ter a few months with­out any treat­ment. NSAID's such as ibupro­fen may ease the pain as can top­i­cal

“Up to seven in 10 women de­velop breast pain at some stage dur­ing their life­time.”

NSAID's. Other treat­ments may be ap­pro­pri­ate depend­ing on whether a cause is found.

BREAST PAIN AND BREAST CANCER

The first symp­tom of breast cancer is usu­ally a pain­less lump. Pain is not usu­ally an early symp­tom; how­ever you should see your doc­tor if you have any con­cerns about breast pain or any other breast symp­toms. Con­sult your GP promptly if you have breast pain and any of the fol­low­ing: * A lump in your breast or un­der your arms * A dis­charge from a lump or nip­ple * A fam­ily his­tory of breast cancer * Swelling and red­ness in your breasts * Any symp­tom of preg­nancy, such as a missed pe­riod.

Breast pain can vary from mild to se­vere

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Ireland

© PressReader. All rights reserved.