“I was go­ing through my prob­lems with al­co­hol and co­caine, and I tried to hide all that. When you’re not to­tally hon­est with the oth­ers in the band – in fact, when you’re not to­tally hon­est with your­self – it just doesn’t work”

The Irish Times - Friday - The Ticket - - Music -

mys­tery why the Den­ver band never made a con­nec­tion with a wider au­di­ence. Grant, though, feels the in­ter­nal prob­lems, which were present from the first day they started play­ing, were the big­gest draw­back.

“We re­ally shouldn’t have been in a band to­gether. There were prob­lems and those prob­lems ap­peared in the records and live shows. I was go­ing through my prob­lems with al­co­hol and co­caine, and I tried to hide all that. When you’re not to­tally hon­est with the oth­ers in the band – in fact, when you’re not to­tally hon­est with your­self – it just doesn’t work. We fought all the time and we hated each other by the end.”

Scarred by that ex­pe­ri­ence, Grant de­cided to turn his back on the mu­sic busi­ness af­ter the band fell apart. He moved to New York.

“I stud­ied to be­come a med­i­cal trans­la­tor and passed the test and got a job in a hos­pi­tal in the city. It was a pretty amaz­ing ex­pe­ri­ence, I have to say, and made me think about stuff I’d never thought about or had locked away for a long time.”

There were also some lin­ger­ing self­es­teem is­sues. Grant grew up in a small, con­ser­va­tive town in Michi­gan. From a young age he knew he was gay, but he also knew that his deeply re­li­gious fam­ily wouldn’t ap­prove. When he did tell his fam­ily, in his early 20s, they didn’t wel­come the news, and Grant’s cy­cle of de­struc­tion be­gan. “There was drugs, there was booze,

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