MAEVE GILCHRIST

The Irish Times - Friday - The Ticket - - MUSIC - SIOB­HÁN LONG NIGEL WOOD

Ad­ven­ture Mu­sic Bal­ance and con­trol, set against the back­drop of a clear blue sky: that’s what Scot­tish harper Maeve Gilchrist con­jures on this un­stint­ingly cel­e­bra­tory collection. As Ca­tri­ona McKay did be­fore her, Gilchrist wrests her harp from the maw of con­ven­tion, re­veal­ing its mus­cu­lar­ity, its ro­bust rhyth­mic pos­si­bil­i­ties and its in­nate com­pat­i­bil­ity with fid­dle, tenor gui­tar and dou­ble bass. The lat­ter pair­ing (with Ai­dan O’Don­nell) is akin to what Keith Jar­rett and Char­lie Haden have done with piano and bass: each rev­el­ling in the in­fi­nite pos­si­bil­i­ties of their in­stru­ments. Pro­duced by Väsen’s Roger Tall­roth, with guest fid­dle from Darol Anger, Gilchrist’s raft of orig­i­nal com­po­si­tions spell col­lec­tively, sun­shine and op­ti­mism, and her spare vo­cals up the wattage fur­ther. If there’s a sound­track to a fine sum­mer, this is it. If there’s a mu­si­cian who can bask in tra­di­tion yet im­merse her­self mu­si­cally in the mul­ti­coloured ex­pe­ri­ence of life, it’s Gilchrist. maeveg­ilchrist­mu­sic. com

ANANSY CISSÉ

Records Down­load: Baala, Sekou Amadou, Gomni

River­boat Up­rooted from his home stu­dio in Diré in the trou­bled north of Mali, Anansy Cissé re­lo­cated to makeshift premises in Ba­mako, where he joined forces with Philippe Sanmiguel, who is now his man­ager and per­cus­sion­ist, . Per­suaded to per­form his own ma­te­rial rather than record­ing oth­ers, it be­came clear that Anansy had a pow­er­ful and dis­tinc­tive style. While his songs (all self-penned) are well within the Malian roots am­bit of trib­utes and so­cial ad­vice, the dis­torted shards and waves of elec­tric gui­tar are a new de­par­ture, seem­ing in­dica­tive of the harsh new re­al­ity in his coun­try.The char­ac­ter­is­tic rolling rhythms of Malian mu­sic, un­der­pinned by ngoni, bass and cal­abash per­cus­sion, take on a fresh ur­gency. Anansy’s im­pas­sioned vo­cals and oc­ca­sional gritty soku fid­dle from Zoumana Tereta raise the game still fur­ther. Play it loud! world­mu­sic.net

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Mali Over­drive

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