Best Film

The Irish Times - Friday - The Ticket - - COVER STORY - DON­ALD CLARKE

IDA

Pawel Paw­likowski, the di­rec­to­rof

My Sum­mer of Love, re­turns after per­sonal tragedy to de­liver his best film yet. This mono­chrome poem fol­lows a Pol­ish novice as, be­fore tak­ing vows, she makes a poignant visit to fam­ily.

PRIDE

Can we say “feel good”? Too late. We al­ready have. Matthew Warchus’s study of in­ter­ac­tion be­tween gay

ac­tivists and strik­ing min­ers in 1980s Bri­tain al­ready plays like the joy­ous mu­si­cal it

is cer­tain to be­come.

UN­DER­THE SKIN

Jonathan Glazer sends im­pas­sive alien Scar­lett Jo­hans­son

to Glas go win a film that­made it sown rules and then broke the mall. It was de­clared “di­vi­sive” on re­lease, but al­ready seems like a mod­ern clas­sic.

HER

Spike Jonze proves his hip aes­thetic can thrive when un con­nected to hith­erto in­sep­a­ra­ble col­lab­o­ra­tor Charlie Kauf­mann. This is a timely, spooky tale of a man who falls for his OS. Jo­hans­son, en­joy­ing a year of tri­umph, pro­vides the smoky voice.

12 YEARS A SLAVE

Who thought that Steve Mc Queen, awk­ward Young Bri­tish Artist, would directa win­ner of the best pic­ture Os­car? His vi­sion­ary study of slav­ery snuck an avant garde sen­si­bil­ity into the main stream.

WEARE THE BEST!

Lukas Moodys­son re­turns tothe 1980s with his de­light­ful tale of a young Swedish punk band bel­low­ing them selves away from every­day trauma. Ev­ery­thing about this film sug­gested crossover suc­cess. Sadly, Moodys­son and his bril­liant cast must set­tle for a cult fol­low­ing.

MRTURNER

Fif­teen year safter his last pe­riod film, Topsy-Turvy, Mike Leigh di­rects a stub­bornly un­usual por­trait of JMW Turner. Ti­mothy Spall de­liv­ers bovine grunts as the pro­tag­o­nist. The film sprawls might­ily. Yet it be­came the di­rec­tor’s big­gest hitto date.

BOY­HOOD

Richard Lin­klater’s touch­ing pic­ture –fol­low­ing a boy and his par­ents over a decade–is a lo­gis­ti­cal mar­vel, but it is so much morethan that. It is the por­trait of an age. It is an es­say on the cru­elty of par­ent­hood.

THE GRAND BU­DAPEST HO­TEL

If you’re still ag­nos­tic about Wes An­der­son after sit­ting through his break neck com­edy of mis­un­der­stand­ings from in­ter-war Europe then you will, most likely, never be per­suaded. Stag­ger­ingly beau­ti­ful. End­lessly funny. Touch­ing in its pas­sion for along with­ered era.

NORTE, THE END OF HIS­TORY

Sit still. Fur­row the brow. At250 min­utes, Lav Diaz’ oblique Philip­pines take on Crime and Pun­ish­ment is eas­ily the long­est re­lease of the year. It’s re­lent­less fo­cus and mas­tery of tone jus­ti­fies the mighty du­ra­tion.

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