Res­cu­ing wildlife

The Irish Times - Weekend Review - - OUTDOORS - SYLVIA THOMP­SON

When you come across an in­jured bird or wild an­i­mal, it can be dif­fi­cult to know whether to in­ter­vene or not.

Some­times, you might be wor­ried that you’ll be bit­ten for your ef­forts or that you might catch a dis­ease from the an­i­mal. At other times, you might not be sure whether the an­i­mal needs hu­man help or not. These con­cerns and many more will be ad­dressed at the Ir­ish Wildlife Re­ha­bil­i­ta­tion con­fer­ence on the Rock Farm, Slane, Co Meath on Satur­day, Oc­to­ber 27th.

Ex­perts will ex­plain how to do first aid on wild birds and an­i­mals and how to look af­ter aban­doned baby an­i­mals once you es­tab­lish that they are def­i­nitely aban­doned. Wildlife Re­ha­bil­i­ta­tion Ire­land is an um­brella or­gan­i­sa­tion which pro­motes wildlife re­ha­bil­i­ta­tion and sup­port­ing the var­i­ous other wildlife re­ha­bil­i­ta­tors who work in this field in Ire­land. wri.ie.

See also irish­wildlife­mat­ters.ie for guid­ance on what you should and shouldn’t do when you come across an in­jured bird or an­i­mal.

You might be wor­ried that you’ll be bit­ten for your ef­forts or that you might catch a dis­ease from the an­i­mal

PHO­TO­GRAPH: STEVE BACK/GETTY IM­AGES

A fox walks past 10 Down­ing Street, Lon­don with a in­jury to his front left leg ear­lier this year.

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