Refit: Lürs­sen - Co­ral Ocean

Superyacht - - What’s On - Text by Da­nie­le Car­ne­va­li – Pho­tos by Jeff Bro­wn

How ma­ny ti­mes ha­ve we read the word ‘ti­me­less’ al­so in the­se pa­ges? Ge­ne­ral­ly as­so­cia­ted to a yacht design, at ti­mes used inap­pro­pria­te­ly on­ly to em­pha­si­ze a mo­del’s good looks. But in the ca­se in point it wi­shes to ex­press its true si­gni­fi­can­ce. “Co­ral Ocean” sports a ti­me­less design ca­pa­ble of de­fea­ting the marks of ti­me. I am sin­ce­re­ly con­vin­ced that buffs for things vin­ta­ge will agree wi­th us. Fir­st and fo­re­mo­st tho­se who we­re able to ad­mi­re her Sep­tem­ber la­st in the cour­se of the la­te­st Mo­na­co Yacht Show. “Co­ral Ocean” boasts flo­wing li­nes a lo­ve­ly si­lhouet­te and of­fers when seen from the stern a gra­ce­ful har­mo­nious fla­ring in spi­te of her 23 years. She on­ce was one of the queens of the MYS. And yes she doe­sn’t show it at all. She hit the wa­ter for the fir­st ti­me back in 1994 wi­th her ori­gi­nal na­me ‘Co­ral Island’ she’s kno­wn to su­pe­rya­cht bro­kers for ha­ving been one of the fi­ne­st and fir­st mo­dels built by the la­te Jo Ban­nen­berg. Wi­th all of her 72 me­tres- a ma­ster­pie­ce in terms of sty­le and class she was con­cei­ved for pri­va­te use and was ne­ver seen on any ya­ch­ting ma­ga­zi­ne.

Af­ter ha­ving spent a good ma­ny win­ters at Lürs­sen’s shi­pyard whe­re she was built, and whe­re she was up­da­ted to com­ply to the la­te­st norms, “Co­ral Ocean” is fi­nal­ly avai­la­ble on the char­ter mar­ket and pic­tu­res of her sump­tuous in­te­riors ha­ve fi­nal­ly been pu­bli­shed. Let’s be­gin from the main deck. The sa­loon’s in­te­riors re­call tho­se of a Po­ly­ne­sian hou­se by the sea spor­ting coar­se­ly wo­ven and un­trea­ted na­tu­ral ma­te­rials from burr oak to mar­ble. The uphol­ste­ry’s hues ran­ge from cream to bro­wn con­vey­ing a strong eth­nic aspect to the en­ti­re area whi­ch is fur­ther en­han­ced by works of art co­ming from Afri­can and Asian cul­tu­res. The li­ving area is fur­ni­shed wi­th com­for­ta­ble so­fas con­tou­ring an Ita­lian cut glass top­ped ta­ble and pro­jec­tor wi­th a re­trac­ta­ble screen. By ope­ning up a lar­ge pa­nel si­tua­ted in­to a la­te­ral bul­khead you can step out on­to a ter­ra­ce for an en­chan­ting ‘al fre­sco ‘ ex­pe­rien­ce. The de­co­ra­ti­ve fi­ni­shes he­re

com­pri­se bark, sil­ver lea­ves and bir­ch burl. “Co­ral Ocean” has ac­com­mo­da­tion for up to twel­ve in six ca­bins. Four are gue­st sui­tes whi­ch ex­tend along the lo­wer deck. Ea­ch one of the­se, fea­tu­res a di­ver­se cha­rac­te­ri­stic whi­le all ha­ve a de­di­ca­ted pri­va­te ba­th­room. A pu­re hand craf­ted wool rug from New Zea­land de­pic­ting brea­king ocean wa­ves, streng­thens the fee­ling of a wel­co­ming hou­se at the sea­si­de on “Co­ral Ocean”. The Gym and well­ness areas can be ac­ces­sed di­rec­tly from the guests’ zo­ne, this was at the ti­me a ra­re fea­tu­re, and an ex­clu­si­ve pre­ro­ga­ti­ve for ve­ry few superyachts. The VIP sui­te is si­tua­ted along the up­per deck, and is equip­ped wi­th a de­di­ca­ted in­ter­nal ba­th­room, and chan­ging room. this sui­te ac­ces­ses di­rec­tly to a pri­va­te stu­dy whi­ch can dou­ble as te­le­vi­sion/en­ter­tain­ment area. The interior decor of this area is ma­de up of bir­ch burl pa­nels, oak floo­ring and oak burr and par­ch­ment fur­ni­tu­re. The fur­ni­tu­re, com­pri­ses a pair of hand­ma­de ma­ho­ga­ny chairs and a te­le­vi­sion set ta­ble de­si­gned by a Bri­ti­sh craf­tsman. The stern sa­loon sports co­he­rent pat­terns, wi­th a VIP sui­te whi­ch is en­ri­ched wi­th In­dian de­co­ra­ti­ve ele­men­ts and croc­ke­ry. The ow­ner’s sui­te is si­tua­ted along the top deck and boasts a lar­ge ba­th­room and war­dro­be/chan­ging room. From up he­re you can en­joy the sight of an in­cre­di­ble pa­no­ra­mic view thanks to all of the gla­zed se­mi­cir­cu­lar pa­nel­ling and to the sky­light abo­ve, whi­ch de­liv--

ers loads of na­tu­ral light and al­so from the dou­ble bed whi­ch ri­ses hi­gher up or do­wn ac­cor­din­gly at the press of a but­ton. The foyer ac­ces­sing the top deck re­veals an old slot ma­chi­ne and se­ve­ral eu­ca­lyp­tus pa­nels.the stair­way lea­ding to the main deck is de­co­ra­ted by a bron­ze sculp­tu­re of a wa­ter­fall. Ac­cess to the sun deck whi­ch hou­ses an in­fi­ni­ty pool equip­ped wi­th a wa­ve/flow ge­ne­ra­ting mo­tor, re­qui­res that guests cross a co­ve­red area spor­ting ports whi­ch look in­to the pool itself so as to be­st ad­mi­re the won­der­ful mo­saics for­ming the pool’s walls. Two se­pa­ra­te areas can be rea­ched via a ma­gni­fi­cent stair­way in the stern. The fir­st one is a bar­be­cue si­tua­ted on the top deck area ideal for in­for­mal meals and ‘sun­do­wn’ long drinks, the other is mo­re sui­ted to for­mal ga­the­rings along the up­per deck whi­ch is equip­ped wi­th sli­ding la­te­ral gla­zed cut glass pa­nels to keep the wind out. Two cu­stom ma­de 8.60 me­tre ten­ders po­we­red by Yan­mar 315HP en­gi­nes are sto­wed along the main deck. The spe­cial­ly ma­de ten­ders are kit­ted out in two dif­fe­rent con­fi­gu­ra­tions, one is an open ver­sion, the other a li­mou­si­ne. A num­ber of jet skis and other wa­ter toys are al­so avai­la­ble for vi­si­ting guests. On­ce the area has been freed up from ten­ders and toys it can dou­ble as a par­ty­ing spot ca­pa­ble of ac­com­mo­da­ting up to about 80 peo­ple. The deck for­ward of the helm con­trols sta­tion hou­ses a Zo­diac 4.50 me­tre Rib de­ployed as re­scue boat, a BSC open 60 and two Sea Doo GTX Li­mi­ted is 260 mo­dels. The­re are 15 crew ca­bins di­stri­bu­ted bet­ween the main and lo­wer decks in ad­di­tion to the cap­tain’s ca­bin whi­ch is si­tua­ted next to the helm con­trols sta­tion. The lo­wer deck al­so com­pri­ses am­ple spa­ce for laun­dry, ship’s sto­res, free­zers and other technical areas. Thanks to a pair of Ca­ter­pil­lar 1,947 HP en­gi­nes “Co­ral Ocean” can rea­ch 17 kno­ts. Her crui­sing ran­ge is of 6,000 nau­ti­cal mi­les. For fur­ther in­for­ma­tion: www.lurs­sen.com

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