Tree­hou­se

Pa­ra­di­si so­spe­si ma an­che ho­tel hi-te­ch su­per­com­fort. Ec­co le ca­se sugli al­be­ri 2.0 Su­spen­ded pa­ra­di­ses, but al­so su­per-com­for­ta­ble highte­ch ho­tels. T ree­hou­ses 2.0

VOGUE Bambini - - IN THIS ISSUE - by Eli­sa­bet­ta Ca­prot­ti

So­no ni­di a tut­ti gli ef­fet­ti. Ma per es­se­ri uma­ni. Per­fet­ta­men­te mi­me­tiz­za­ti nel­la na­tu­ra. Eco­com­pa­ti­bi­li, ma an­che su­per tec­no­lo­gi­ci. La­scia­no so­spe­si a de­ci­ne di me­tri d’al­tez­za, per­met­to­no di go­de­re di pa­no­ra­mi moz­za­fia­to e sen­tir­si co­me aqui­le che guar­da­no la ter­ra dal pro­prio ri­fu­gio in­con­ta­mi­na­to. Lon­ta­no dal­la ci­vil­tà e dallo smog. So­no le tree­hou­se 2.0, un sogno non so­lo per i più pic­co­li, do­ve ri­po­sa­re, pen­sa­re, leg­ge­re e fi­lo­so­feg­gia­re di­men­ti­can­do lo scor­re­re del­le ore. Un tempo mi­ni­ca­set­te for­ma­te da poche as­si di legno, og­gi vez­zo di de­si­gner green-orien­ted; co­me Ro­de­rick Ro­me­ro che le ha realizzate an­che per Don­na Ka­ran, Ju­lian­ne Moo­re, Oz­zy Osbour­ne e per Sting, nel­la la sua te­nu­ta nel Chian­ti. Le più in­cre­di­bi­li e fu­tu­ri­sti­che co­stru­zio­ni sull’al­be­ro si tro­va­no nel­la Lap­po­nia sve­de­se, ad Ha­rads, do­ve si può go­de­re l’au­ro­ra bo­rea­le e fa­re una sau­na, ap­pol­la­ia­ti sul­le ci­me del­la fo­re­sta, in sei sui­te a for­ma di cu­bo spec­chia­to, di na­vi­cel­la spa­zia­le, di ni­do d’uc­cel­lo o di li­bel­lu­la. Dall’altro ca­po del mondo, in Nuo­va Ze­lan­da, in­ve­ce, un grup­po di im­pren­di­to­ri si è sfi­da­to nel rea­liz­za­re in 66 gior­ni una ca­sa su se­quo­ia uti­liz­zan­do so­la­men­te le istru­zio­ni tro­va­te su un li­bro: il ri­sul­ta­to è sta­to un ri­sto­ran­te mol­to fa­shion, un boz­zo­lo la­mel­la­re che si il­lu­mi­na co­me una lan­ter­na, di­ven­ta­to già cult ad Auc­kland. Ma la pri­ma co­mu­ni­tà eco­so­ste­ni­bi­le, co­sti­tui­ta da persone che vi­vo­no sugli al­be­ri, si tro­va in Costa Ri­ca in un an­go­lo di pa­ra­di­so del­la fo­re­sta plu­via­le. Qui da otto an­ni un grup­po di eco­lo­gi­sti, che di an­no in an­no di­ven­ta sem­pre più nu­me­ro­so, ha de­ci­so di vi­ve­re in ar­mo­nia con la na­tu­ra. Fug­gen­do per sem­pre dallo stress e dal caos del mondo ci­vi­liz­za­to.

They’re nests…for hu­mans. Per­fec­tly ca­mou­fla­ged in na­tu­re, they’re eco-com­pa­ti­ble but al­so hi­gh-te­ch. Su­spen­ded ten me­ters or mo­re abo­ve ground, they of­fer brea­th­ta­king pa­no­ra­mas and let you feel li­ke ea­gles ob­ser­ving the ear­th from their pri­sti­ne re­fu­ge far from ci­vi­li­za­tion and smog. They’re tree­hou­ses 2.0, a dream for kids of any age whe­re you can re­st, think, read, and phi­lo­so­phi­ze, for­get­ting the pas­sing ti­me. On­ce ti­ny hou­ses ma­de from a few planks of wood, to­day they are the whim of green-orien­ted de­si­gners li­ke Ro­de­rick Ro­me­ro, who ma­de ones for Don­na Ka­ran, Ju­lian­ne Moo­re, Oz­zy Osbour­ne and Sting on his Chian­ti estate. The mo­st in­cre­di­ble fu­tu­ri­stic tree­hou­ses are in Ha­rads in Swe­di­sh La­pland, whe­re you can ga­ze at the Au­ro­ra Bo­rea­lis and ha­ve a sau­na per­ched on the tree­tops of the forest in six sui­tes sha­ped li­ke a mir­ro­red cu­be, spa­ce ship, bird’s ne­st or dra­gon­fly. Across the glo­be in New Zea­land, a group of en­tre­pre­neurs ac­cep­ted the chal­len­ge to build a hou­se on a se­quo­ia in ju­st 66 days and on­ly using the in­struc­tions found in a book. The re­sult is a tren­dy re­stau­rant, a la­mel­lar co­coon that lights up li­ke a lan­tern and is now an ico­nic spot in Auc­kland. The fir­st eco-su­stai­na­ble com­mu­ni­ty crea­ted by peo­ple who li­ve on trees is in a cor­ner of pa­ra­di­se of the rain­fo­re­st in Costa Ri­ca. A group of eco­lo­gists ca­me he­re eight years ago to li­ve in har­mo­ny wi­th na­tu­re, fleeing from the stress and chaos of the ci­vi­li­zed world: ea­ch year, that num­ber con­ti­nues to grow.

‘THE Q UIET HOU­SE’ BY BL UE FOREST (PHO­TO MATT LIVEY)

‘MIR­ROR TREE­HOU­SE’ THAM & VIDEGÅRD ARKITEKTER

‘HILL LOD­GE RE­SORT’ BY SOOK ARCHITECTS COM­PA­NY LI­MI­TED

CON­CEPT FOR PRI­VA­TE HOU­SE, 1516 GREEN INTERIOR ARCHITECTURAL COM­PA­NY LI­MI­TED

‘EMBRYO’ AN­TO­NY GIBBON DE­SI­GNS

‘FREE SPI­RIT SPHERES’, TOM CHUDLEIGH

‘TREE SNA­KE HOU­SES’ LUÍS REBELO DE AN­DRA­DE (PH. RI­CAR­DO OLIVEIRA AL­VES)

PRO­JECT BY SU­STAI­NA­BLE AESTHETICS LI­MI­TED, TRIUM­PH ARCHITECTURAL TREE­HOU­SE AWARD 2014, SPE­CIAL RECOGNITION

‘MID AME­RI­CA SCIEN­CE MU­SEUM SKYWALK’, WITTENBERG DELONY & DAVIDSON ARCHITECTS

Newspapers in Italian

Newspapers from Italy

© PressReader. All rights reserved.