EAR­TH

VOGUE Bambini - - COUNTRY GANGS -

Free­ze-fra­me su bi­blio­te­che ab­ban­do­na­te, de­ser­te da tem­po im­me­mo­re, in cui la ve­ge­ta­zio­ne lus­su­reg­gian­te ha ri­co­strui­to sce­na­ri ri­go­glio­si. Cit­tà di­sa­bi­ta­te, cen­tri spa­zia­li un tem­po all’avan­guar­dia or­mai an­da­ti in ro­vi­na, riar­re­da­ti da mu­schi e li­che­ni pro­rom­pen­ti. Cul­tu­re e sa­pe­ri an­da­ti per­du­ti, si­len­zi di­ve­nu­ti as­sor­dan­ti di fron­te a una ci­vil­tà che non ha sa­pu­to ge­sti­re le ri­sor­se. E su cui la na­tu­ra ha pre­so il so­prav­ven­to di­mo­stran­do di es­se­re l’uni­ca for­za su que­sto Pia­ne­ta in gra­do au­to­ge­stir­si. È la vi­sio­ne no­stal­gi­ca e ap­pas­sio­na­ta dell’ar­ti­sta ame­ri­ca­na Lo­ri Nix, che ri­pro­du­ce in stu­dio dio­ra­mi ac­cu­ra­tis­si­mi di mon­di de­so­la­ti di cui poi ne fo­to­gra­fa l’es­sen­za. «È l’idea di un luo­go do­ve le for­ze del­la na­tu­ra re­cla­ma­no il lo­ro spa­zio che di­ven­ta an­co­ra più ef­fi­ca­ce se pen­sia­mo al­la sfi­da am­bien­ta­le che il mon­do og­gi ci po­ne», spie­ga l’ar­ti­sta. Qua­si un mo­ni­to, per non di­men­ti­ca­re i pro­ble­mi del pia­ne­ta che le nuo­ve ge­ne­ra­zio­ni so­no de­sti­na­te ad af­fron­ta­re. Sa­ran­no i bam­bi­ni i pio­nie­ri di un nuo­vo mon­do? La Ear­th Edu­ca­tion è co­min­cia­ta in ogni an­go­lo del pia­ne­ta. E un eser­ci­to di pic­co­li at­ti­vi­sti no-global, eco­lo­gi­sti, pa­la­di­ni del­la ter­ra, o me­glio an­co­ra fra­tel­li e so­rel­le del­la na­tu­ra, avan­za­no per co­strui­re un mon­do mi­glio­re. «I più pic­co­li han­no un de­sti­no spe­cia­le», ha sen­ten­zia­to la scrit­tri­ce e pe­dia­tra Iris Pa­ciot­ti, «quel­lo di sal­va­re la Ter­ra e de­ter­ge­re la na­tu­ra of­fe­sa dall’uo­mo per ri­scat­ta­re la pre­zio­si­tà del no­stro si­ste­ma di vi­ta na­tu­ra­le». The sce­ne por­trays aban­do­ned li­bra­ries, de­ser­ted for ages, whe­re th­ri­ving ve­ge­ta­tion has re­crea­ted ver­dant sce­nes. Uni­n­ha­bi­ted ci­ties, pla­ces on­ce in the van­guard and now in ruin, are re­de­co­ra­ted by lu­sh li­chen and moss. With their lo­st cul­tu­res and kno­w­led­ge, dea­fe­ning si­len­ce is what re­mains of a ci­vi­li­za­tion that squan­de­red its re­sour­ces. Na­tu­re pre­vails, pro­ving that it is the on­ly for­ce on this pla­net able to ta­ke ca­re of itself. This is the no­stal­gic and pas­sio­na­te vi­sion of Ame­ri­can ar­ti­st Lo­ri Nix, who pain­sta­kin­gly crea­tes dio­ra­mas of de­so­la­te worlds of whi­ch she then cap­tu­res the es­sen­ce. “It’s the idea of a pla­ce whe­re the for­ces of na­tu­re re­claim their spa­ce and be­co­me even mo­re ef­fec­ti­ve if we think of the en­vi­ron­men­tal chal­len­ge that the world pre­sen­ts us”, ex­plai­ned the ar­ti­st. It is al­mo­st a war­ning so we won’t for­get the pro­blems of the pla­net that new ge­ne­ra­tions are for­ced to fa­ce. Will kids be the pio­neers of a new world? Ear­th Edu­ca­tion has star­ted in eve­ry cor­ner of the pla­net. An ar­my of lit­tle no-global ac­ti­vists, eco­lo­gists, and pa­la­dins of the ear­th or, bet­ter yet, bro­thers and si­sters of na­tu­re ad­van­ce to build a bet­ter world. “Chil­dren ha­ve a spe­cial de­sti­ny”, says au­thor and pe­dia­tri­cian Iris Pa­ci­not­ti. “They mu­st sa­ve the Ear­th and clean­se na­tu­re har­med by hu­mans to sa­ve our pre­cious eco-sy­stem”.

DUE OPE­RE DELL’AR­TI­STA E FO­TO­GRA­FA LO­RI NIX DEL­LA SE­RIE ‘THE CITY’. LIBRARY, 2007, E SPA­CE CEN­TER, 2013 (COUR­TE­SY PA­CI CON­TEM­PO­RA­RY, BRE­SCIA-POR­TO CER­VO). L’AR­TI­STA ESPORRÀ NEL­LA STA­GIO­NE ESTI­VA AL­LA GAL­LE­RIA PA­CI DI POR­TO CER­VO.

Newspapers in Italian

Newspapers from Italy

© PressReader. All rights reserved.