6. HAVE A MAM­MO­GRAM ONCE A YEAR AFTER 40

Jamaica Gleaner - - HEALTH -

Ac­cu­mu­lat­ing ev­i­dence sug­gests a link be­tween smok­ing and breast can­cer risk, par­tic­u­larly in pre­menopausal women. Ad­di­tion­ally, not smok­ing is one of the best things you can do for your over­all health.

Mam­mog­ra­phy is con­sid­ered the most pow­er­ful breast can­cer de­tec­tion tool. An­nual mam­mo­grams help de­tect breast can­cer early and sig­nif­i­cantly im­prove the chances that it can be treated suc­cess­fully. The five-year sur­vival rate can be as high as 98 per cent for the ear­li­est-stage lo­calised disease, but hov­ers around 27 per cent for the dis­tant-stage, or metastatic, disease. If you’re at high risk for breast can­cer, with a strong fam­ily history of breast or ovar­ian can­cer, or have had ra­di­a­tion treat­ment to the chest in the past, it’s rec­om­mended that you start hav­ing an­nual mam­mo­grams at a younger age (often be­gin­ning around age 30). Dis­cuss with your health-care provider.

Vig­or­ous ex­er­cises help your heart and cut your can­cer risk.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Jamaica

© PressReader. All rights reserved.