Old man Mu­sev­eni, take a look at my life, you can see I’m a lot like you were

The East African - - OPIN­ION -

and trust­wor­thi­ness, choose the younger of the two. But if the younger one is a crook, a swindler or a rapist, then for heav­ens’ sake choose the old­ster.

So, I think Mu­sev­eni could have gone on till his mid-90s with­out be­ing chal­lenged by some­one whose only claim to fame is youth. I think what has got him into trou­ble is that he has been found to be a fake and a power glut­ton.

He came to power 32 years ago pro­claim­ing rev­o­lu­tion­ary ideals and cas­ti­gat­ing African rulers who over­stayed their wel­come and promised to give Uganda back to Ugan­dans. In those three-plus decades he has mor­phed into a tyrant who seems to be­lieve that his fam­ily is more important than the rest of the peo­ple of Uganda.

Be bribed; or be ter­rorised

He has man­aged to bribe his way out up to now, shame­lessly buy­ing leg­is­la­tors to make this or that change to the Con­sti­tu­tion. Al­ter­na­tively, for those like Kizza Be­si­gye who re­fused to be bought, Mu­sev­eni un­leashed ter­ror, mak­ing the good old doc­tor per­haps the most ar­rested politi­cian in the world. And this is a former com­radein-arms in the bush war and his per­sonal physi­cian to boot. In­grat­i­tude, thy name is politi­cian.

Now Be­si­gye may have run his course, fought the good fight and taken as much onto his head as a man may be able to ab­sorb.

The point he tried to make, that is that Uganda is not the prop­erty of one man and his fam­ily and that Mu­sev­eni must go, was not heeded. Now it is the turn of an­other gen­er­a­tion of Be­si­gyes to tell Mu­sev­eni where he gets off.

Acts of violence

Cometh the hour cometh the man? Who knows? Bobi Wine is not your con­ven­tional politi­cian, but he makes his mes­sage easy to get as it is mostly ex­pressed in mu­sic. There is noth­ing to move crowds of un­em­ployed and frus­trated youth more eas­ily than mu­sic, and Bobi Wine has been dish­ing it out in shov­el­fuls.

Mu­sev­eni is run­ning scared, and has tried to pin charges of trea­son and ac­cused him of com­mit­ting “acts of violence,” which has to be kind of funny if you know Mu­sev­eni’s his­tory.

Violence is what Mu­sev­eni did in the 1980s in Luwero, and it car­ried him to State House six years later. Maybe some­one else is hav­ing sim­i­lar ideas.

The old war­riors, the Be­si­gyes et al, may be a bit jaded by a strug­gle that has yielded lit­tle but per­sonal suf­fer­ing, may be jus­ti­fied for want­ing to take it a lit­tle eas­ier and en­joy a latelife respite.

But the young will fight the good fight of the old. It is the same coun­try, it is the same cause, it is the same quest for free­dom.

It will not die. Mu­sev­eni was cred­ited with bring­ing a sem­blance of sta­bil­ity to Uganda. But, hon­estly, even he must know now that he has over­stayed. This world has known mo­men­tary he­roes, who have failed to read the clock.

It may be tricky for some­one who has held onto power il­le­git­i­mately for

The old war­riors, the Be­si­gyes et al, may be a bit jaded by a strug­gle that has yielded lit­tle but per­sonal suf­fer­ing, may be jus­ti­fied for want­ing to take it a lit­tle eas­ier

so long to now say they are quit­ting, but surely the former rev­o­lu­tion­ary will be able to come up with a strat­egy to or­gan­ise a cred­i­ble tran­si­tion that may still save his legacy. It is not about gen­er­a­tions; it is about pro­pri­ety.

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