Raila Odinga in­cites, not MP Moses Kuria

The Star (Kenya) - - Front Page -

“Democ­racy is so over­rated.” So said the fic­tional nar­cis­sis­tic Amer­i­can politi­cian Frank Un­der­wood, who rose to be Pres­i­dent in the po­lit­i­cal tele­vi­sion show As a Kenyan, I find it near im­pos­si­ble for one not to get the gist of that oh-so-pro­found state­ment. We have the priv­i­lege to gift our­selves with the au­ton­omy to select those to whom we en­trust the power of gov­er­nance.

But we pre­car­i­ously com­pro­mise our in­valu­able lives ow­ing to what I can plainly term sheer un­nec­es­sary ig­no­rance, which likens us to prim­i­tive life forms that lack the most ba­sic in­stinct of self-preser­va­tion.

The worst thing about democ­racy within such a so­ci­ety is that the ig­no­rant ma­jor­ity con­demns with it the con­scious mi­nor­ity and that can only be termed a sorry state of af­fairs.

The un­for­tu­nate fact that the gen­eral stan­dard of my liv­ing is low­ered not by my own do­ing, but by that of a mis­led peo­ple, that abuses con­sti­tu­tional priv­i­leges, makes me won­der where democ­racy — the most vi­able sys­tem of gov­er­nance(for now) — went wrong.

I’d con­fi­dently aver that our mis­for­tunes are a re­sult of the ac­cep­tance by a vast ma­jor­ity that the way things are is the way they al­ways will be, just as they have al­ways been.

The thing that vexes me the most is the peo­ple’s un­wa­ver­ing sup­port for regimes that openly dis­re­gard their in­her­ent dig­nity.

Take the launch of the Ju­bilee Party for in­stance. Call it JP or call it the amal­ga­ma­tion of po­lit­i­cal par­ties that clinched power at the last gen­eral elec­tion. Call it what­ever you want. The play­ers are still the same.

The fun­ni­est (in a twisted and sad way) thing about this ‘re­birth’ is that bil­lions were spent to cover the event when purely pre­ventable deaths are com­mon in tax-funded health fa­cil­i­ties.

It beats logic that our callous lead­ers command a phenomenal cult fol­low­ing when they lit­er­ally do noth­ing for the gen­eral growth of Kenya as a na­tion.

What’s even worse is the phenomenal cul­tic fol­low­ing they command that makes ab­so­lutely no sense if Kenyans are pre­sum­ably a self-con­scious peo­ple.

I un­der­stand that the coun­try is be­com­ing a cap­i­tal­ist state, but that can­not come close to jus­ti­fy­ing the ev­er­grow­ing dis­par­ity be­tween the poor and the wealthy catal­ysed by the glut­tony of the cus­to­di­ans of be­stowed lead­er­ship.

If that should be the state of things, then I wouldn’t mind liv­ing un­der a com­mu­nist regime, how­ever scary that might seem.

The way I see all this, the one thing that most ef­fec­tively serves to de­pict our lead­ers as en­e­mies of the Mother­land is the fact that they can ac­tu­ally pin a price on the lives of their sub­jects. Yes, sub­jects.

When you value the ex­al­ta­tion of your money maker in the em­bod­i­ment of your ‘re­de­fined’ and ‘re-en­er­gised’ po­lit­i­cal party over the wel­fare of the sickly — who can barely af­ford food for their frail, clue­less and in­no­cent chil­dren, let alone health­care — then noth­ing more need be ut­tered save for the as­ser­tion that you kill Kenyans day by day through your omis­sions.

That is not by even the broad­est of def­i­ni­tions close to be­ing a leader.

IT BEATS LOGIC THAT OUR CALLOUS LEAD­ERS COMMAND A PHENOMENAL CULT FOL­LOW­ING WHEN THEY LIT­ER­ALLY DO NOTH­ING FOR THE GEN­ERAL GROWTH AND DE­VEL­OP­MENT OF KENYA AS A NA­TION

NGUNJIRI WAMBUGU

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