TIME MU­DAVADI TOOK RUTO HEAD-ON

Word has it that res­i­dents in Western are grow­ing rest­less fol­low­ing the ap­par­ent lack of deco­rum by the Deputy Pres­i­dent, who spares no chance to also hurl in­sults at the lo­cal lead­ers

The Star (Kenya) - - Voices - JUMA KWAYERA

Former Deputy Prime Min­is­ter and Amani Na­tional Congress leader Musalia Mu­davadi must now es­ca­late his re­sponse to fre­quent in­sults by Deputy Pres­i­dent Wil­liam Ruto ev­ery time he cam­paigns in Western. Word has it that res­i­dents are grow­ing rest­less fol­low­ing the ap­par­ent lack of deco­rum by DP Ruto, who spares no chance to also hurl in­sults at the lo­cal lead­ers, whom he wants to join the Ju­bilee Party by force. The lat­est round of vit­riol was in Shinyalu, when the DP said Pres­i­dent Uhuru Keny­atta should leave the re­gion to him to han­dle. It is on record that Ruto, while at a public func­tion in Baringo two months ago, deroga­to­rily re­ferred to Mu­davadi as “that Luhya” and reg­u­larly refers to the res­i­dents as “hawa wa­jinga wa hapa chini” (the fools from Western).

Res­i­dents are frus­trated af­ter years of rel­e­ga­tion of the re­gion to the pe­riph­ery of eco­nomic and so­cial de­vel­op­ment. In some way, there­fore, the DP may be right in re­fer­ring to the re­gion as “hawa wa­jinga wa hapa chini”.

The com­mu­nity has for so long been at the mercy of the political elite in suc­ces­sive gov­ern­ments, save for the period former Cheran­gany MP Masinde Muliro, former Butere MP Martin Shikuku and former Vice Pres­i­dent Michael Wa­malwa Ki­jana were ac­tive in pol­i­tics. The past rat pack of lead­ers who wanted to run for the top seat is no longer the case. Mu­davadi has emerged as the front-run­ner, the rea­son why Ruto, and, by ex­ten­sion, JP, is hav­ing sleep­less nights.

This is de­spite the re­cent rev­e­la­tions about how cheaply they “bought” some MPs from the re­gion. The politi­cians were ru­moured to have re­ceived be­tween Sh3 mil­lion and Sh8 mil­lion to de­fect from their former par­ties.

Some of the gov­er­nors, MPs and MCAs, who ac­com­pany the DP, have at some point in the past four years been im­pli­cated in graft. The high­light of it be­ing the Bun­goma “non-car­cino­genic wheel­bar­rows” scan­dal that cost the tax­payer Sh109,000 each.

It is here that the rub­ber meets the road. The truth about Western’s political hawkers must be ex­posed and they must be made to pay for their affin­ity to blood money. Hawkers by their very na­ture lack morals: They are driven by the de­sire to sell their wares.

Af­ter the Shinyalu rally, sto­ries of how the MPs who ac­com­pa­nied the DP have each been put on a retainer fee of Sh100,000 a week have emerged. The al­leged dis­penser of the cash, an MP from Mu­mias, is re­port­edly on the dole to the tune of Sh500,000 weekly. The same MP faces al­le­ga­tions of hav­ing col­luded with man­agers of the Mu­mias Sugar Com­pany to de­prive farm­ers of their hard-earned earn­ings. Talk of cor­rupt lead­ers vom­it­ing on the shoes of the peo­ple they steal from.

It is against this back­drop that Mu­davadi must take the war to Ruto head-on and re­mind him of how he is dogged by al­le­ga­tions of cor­rup­tion and eth­nic jin­go­ism. Un­like the Pres­i­dent, he has on sev­eral oc­ca­sions been linked to cor­rupt deal­ings. The land of Mulembe has thus be­come the most pop­u­lar dump­ing ground for loot. The sit­u­a­tion is very much sim­i­lar to what ob­tained when Mu­davadi served as Fi­nance min­is­ter be­tween 1993-97.

Now that he is seek­ing to be Pres­i­dent, he should re­but Ruto’s for­ays into Western with strong call to ac­count for his in­ex­haustible re­sources. The Church in Western also needs to ride on the mo­ral high ground and re­ject con­tri­bu­tions trace­able to ques­tion­able land trans­ac­tions, and di­verted public money.

THE TRUTH ABOUT WESTERN’S POLITICAL HAWKERS MUST BE EX­POSED. THEY MUST PAY FOR THEIR AFFIN­ITY TO BLOOD MONEY. MANY OF THEM ARE ON A SH100,000 RETAINER FEE PAID EV­ERY WEEK

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