Living mon­u­ments add beauty to moun­tain

The Pyongyang Times - - The Pyongyang Times - By Kim Yong Chan PT

Korea, which has been called a silk-em­broi­dered land of three thou­sand ri from olden times for its high moun­tains and clear wa­ter, is blessed with living mon­u­ments.

Mt My­ohyang, one of the six cel­e­brated moun­tains of Korea, has many living mon­u­ments which add more to its scenery.

Dozens of ob­jects in­clud­ing wild mul­berry, ash tree and pine tree on Mt My­ohyang are pro­tected as na­tional living mon­u­ments.

Es­pe­cially, the wild mul­berry grow­ing in the court­yard of Po­hyon Tem­ple is the tallest and old­est tree among the same species in the coun­try. It is the coun­try’s trea­sure of ed­u­ca­tional and aca­demic value, pro­mot­ing the nat­u­ral scenery of the moun­tain.

Des­ig­nated as a living mon­u­ment in Jan­uary 1980, the tree is known to have been planted in around 1680.

It is 14.6 me­tres tall, 4 me­tres around at the bot­tom and 3 me­tres around at the height of 1 me­tre and its crown is 16.9 me­tres wide from east to west and 15.1 me­tres wide from north to south.

The ash tree grows near the My­ohyang Stream a lit­tle away from Po­hyon Tem­ple and it looks like two trees stand­ing to­gether as its trunk forks into two. Grow­ing with other species of trees, it is es­ti­mated to have taken root in around 1870.

The tree was des­ig­nated as a living mon­u­ment in Jan­uary 1980. It is 24.4 me­tres tall, 3.6 me­tres around at the bot­tom and 3 me­tres around at the height of 1 me­tre and its crown is 15.7 me­tres wide from east to west and 14.1 me­tres wide from north to south.

Other living mon­u­ments on Mt My­ohyang in­clude Rhodo­den­dron ye­doense group that is in full bloom be­tween April and May, a pine tree whose trunk and bark are typ­i­cally red­dish, fly­ing squir­rel, Ry­ongyon Falls in Sang­won Val­ley and Chonju Rock.

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