Gone but never for­got­ten

Kuwait Times - - FROM THE ARABIC PRESS - By Dr Khaled Al-Saleh

Anine-year-old child and a sixty-year-old woman were my col­leagues at Kuwait Cancer Con­trol Cen­ter (KCCC) be­fore the Iraqi In­va­sion. Both were left be­hind by their fam­i­lies af­ter they left Kuwait. The child re­cov­ered through chemo­ther­apy and has be­come a per­ma­nent res­i­dent there. The old lady, who was bedrid­den, also re­mained there un­til the In­va­sion. The hos­pi­tal be­came their home, and the staff be­came their fam­i­lies. The child was loved by all and be­came the flower of the ward, and the lady, a bless­ing.

The child no longer cared about his real fam­ily though at times I felt that he missed them, but the old lady kept giv­ing ex­cuses for her own fam­ily. She was sick and prayed a lot and shared sto­ries about her fam­ily. I lived with them for months un­til the In­va­sion. They both dis­ap­peared, and till now I do not know their where­abouts. They were nowhere to be found af­ter the In­va­sion.

There are un­for­get­table sto­ries at the KCCC. There are sto­ries that al­ways re­main fresh in your mem­ory. De­spite the ren­o­va­tion of the hos­pi­tal’s wards, ev­ery time I pass through that par­tic­u­lar ward I pic­ture them both as if they never left. It is like a part of their souls were left be­hind as an im­pres­sion re­mind­ing us of them.

— Trans­lated by Kuwait Times

It is like a part of their souls were left be­hind as an im­pres­sion re­mind­ing us of them

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