U SO­CI­ETY

U Magazine - - CONTENTS - By LAILA SWAIS

The six cat­e­gory myth-busts for the most com­monly mis­taken health as­sump­tions to gain knowl­edge-power for pro­gress­ing to­wards a truly health­ier lifestyle.

OR­GANIC FOOD IT’S ECO-FRIENDLY

Ma­jor com­pa­nies around the world, such as Kra(, Gen­eral Mills and Kel­logg’s ac­tu­ally im­port raw (or­ganic) ma­te­ri­als from abroad for a low cost due to the ex­ces­sive de­mand of their prod­ucts, and only have a small por­tion lo­cally (or or­gan­i­cally) grown. #e trans­porta­tion of a large por­tion of their in­gre­di­ents ac­tu­ally adds to pol­lu­tion cost. And while some peo­ple buy “or­ganic” think­ing that the plants are grown in a more con­ven­tional way with no pes­ti­cides, fact is, farm­ers ex­ces­sively use nat­u­ral pes­ti­cides rather than syn­thetic ones to en­sure they are just as e"ec­tive! Ac­knowl­edg­ing all this, some have even gone as far as la­belling the or­ganic trend as a mar­ket­ing hype with non-justi!able added costs.

IT’S HEALTH­IER

Although lack­ing syn­thetic %avors, sweet­en­ers, preser­va­tives and any ad­di­tives, USDA does not make any claim that or­ganic food is more nu­tri­tious than its non-or­ganic coun­ter­part! Potato chips are potato chips (even if the pota­toes are or­ganic!), and cane sugar is still a form of sugar – so watch your calo­rie in­take. Nev­er­the­less, the good thing about or­ganic food is that the an­i­mals used for pro­vid­ing milk or meat roam in free range farms.

THE WORD “OR­GANIC” MEANS THE FOOD IS 100% OR­GANIC!

La­bels are usu­ally de­ceiv­ing. #e rule is, if it says “or­ganic” on the la­bel, it means it’s made up of 95% or­ganic in­gre­di­ents. If it reads “made with or­ganic in­gre­di­ents,” it may only have up to 70% or­ganic com­po­nents.

GRO­CERY SHOP­PING

WHITE EGGS ARE LESS NU­TRI­TIOUS THAN BROWN EGGS Although true, that brown is bet­ter than white bread, and cane sugar is bet­ter than white sugar, in this case, the color of the eggshell doesn’t in­di­cate that brown is bet­ter than white, de­spite that they usu­ally cost more than white eggs. #e eggshell color is just a color, noth­ing more, noth­ing less.

FRESH IS HEALTH­IER THAN FROZEN

Not nec­es­sar­ily the case. Some fresh veg­eta­bles can be more ex­posed to air pol­lu­tion be­ing trans­ported long dis­tances. #e heat can also con­tam­i­nate them faster. Frozen veg­eta­bles and fruits ac­tu­ally have, at many times, more nu­tri­ents pre­served than fresh foods.

LESS SODIUM IN SEA SALT

Don’t be de­ceived by the fancy pack­ag­ing and the words writ­ten on salt pack­ages. A gram of sea salt has as much sodium as a gram of ta­ble salt. How­ever, sea salt looks more ap­peal­ing with its per­fectly rounded crys­tals, and since the crys­tals are slightly larger than reg­u­lar salt, you may be in­clined to sprin­kle less on your food.

“ALL NAT­U­RAL” ON THE LA­BEL IN­DI­CATES IT IS HEALTHY

#e words “all nat­u­ral” are not enough to make the prod­uct health­ier. You need to look out for ad­di­tional words such as “no arti!cial %avors added,” “no col­or­ings or preser­va­tives” just to say the least.

CLEAN HANDS

AN­TIBAC­TE­RIAL GEL KILLS GERMS Yes, an­tibac­te­rial gel might be harm­ful to you. Although we as­sume that the FDA usu­ally ap­proves all in­gre­di­ents for foods and prod­ucts we con­sume, it is not al­ways the case. Un­til this day, the FDA has not ap­proved the chem­i­cal tri­closan which is found in an­tibac­te­rial gels, and one that is con­tro­ver­sially de­bated in terms of its pos­si­ble harm­ful e"ects. Re­duce con­sump­tion to a min­i­mum by us­ing good old soap and wa­ter. More­over, as com­monly known, an­tibac­te­rial gels kill ev­ery­thing o" your hands – in­clud­ing the nat­u­ral “good” germs on your skin. Some ex­perts even pre­dict that by killing both good and bad germs, su­per­bugs may form ' which re­quire an­tibi­otics.

WASH­ING YOUR HANDS WITH WARM WA­TER IS BET­TER FOR KILLING GERMS

Not nec­es­sar­ily true. #ere is no di"er­ence un­less you are wash­ing your hands at a wa­ter tem­per­a­ture of 100 de­grees Cel­sius (boiling wa­ter!). #e key to wash­ing your hands is scrub­bing and rub­bing your hands with soap and dry­ing with a clean towel. Ac­cord­ing to Mayo Clinic stud­ies, 20 sec­onds of scrub­bing is good enough for clean­li­ness.

PILL IN­TAKE

MUL­TIVI­TA­MINS IM­PROVE YOUR OVER­ALL HEALTH Many stud­ies con­ducted on mul­tivi­ta­mins prove no ex­tra added bene!ts. Hav­ing a rich-bal­anced diet is what makes a di"er­ence for over­all health. In fact, if you’re eat­ing rea­son­ably, get­ting the ex­tra vi­ta­mins may cause health com­pli­ca­tions. Sim­ply eat­ing fruits and veg­eta­bles al­lows your body to pro­duce its own an­tiox­i­dants com­pared to tak­ing them in vi­ta­min form.

DON'TMIXBIRTHCONTROLPILLSWITHANTIBIOTICS

An­tibi­otics have no e"ect on the e"ec­tive­ness and us­age of birth con­trol pills.

WEIGHT LOSS

YOU CAN TRANS­FORM FAT INTO MUS­CLE Ex­er­cise Phys­i­ol­o­gist, Dr. Sukala, in­di­cates that burn­ing fat and build­ing mus­cles are two di"er­ent pro­cesses, men­tion­ing, “fat and mus­cle are two di"er­ent meta­bolic tis­sues and one does not con­vert into the other. What does hap­pen is this: as you start eat­ing health­fully and ex­er­cis­ing, the fat grad­u­ally burns o" and goes away, and you start to build mus­cle. #ey are two to­tally sep­a­rate pro­cesses.”

LATE-NIGHT EAT­ING MAKES YOU FAT

#is is a false state­ment. How­ever, peo­ple do tend to overeat more at night sim­ply be­cause they are more tired and less func­tional to­wards the evening. In ad­di­tion to this, the hunger hor­mone grehlin, and lep­tin (the ap­petite hor­mone) may be al­tered when your body is tired late at night, and in some cases can a"ect eat­ing habits early morn­ing the next day.

AVOID­ING GERMS

COLD WEATHER MAKES YOU SICK Peo­ple are not more prone to sick­ness dur­ing win­ter­time be­cause of the cold weather, but be­cause they are be­ing less ac­tive and stay mostly in­doors, where germs easily make pres­ence with­out the proper air ven­ti­la­tion and cir­cu­la­tion.

THE FIVE-SEC­OND RULE TO EAT­ING FOOD THAT FELL ON THE FLOOR

If food falls on the %oor and spends a mere mil­lisec­ond there, it will at­tract bac­te­ria. #e is­sue here is not time, but the food’s mois­ture, sur­face ge­om­e­try and %oor con­di­tion.

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