Why you need a business card

Lesotho Times - - Jobs & Tenders -

ONE of the first things you lose when you lose a job is the rel­e­vancy of your business card, es­pe­cially if you were lucky enough to have one.

If you’re tempted to hand out an old business card and write your new con­tact info on the back, stop. Or­der­ing business cards is one of the least ex­pen­sive in­vest­ments you can make in your­self to present a pro­fes­sional de­meanor when in­ter­view­ing or net­work­ing.

It pro­vides an easy way for follow-up con­tact, and can pro­vide a way to po­si­tion your­self to prospec­tive hir­ing man­agers.

To­day, business cards are so easy to or­der with a fast turn-around time that there’s no rea­son you shouldn’t have one for your next in­ter­view or net­work­ing event. In fact, get­ting your own “per­sonal” business card is one of the first things you should do the day after a lay­off.

In pre­par­ing for the new job hunt, you can eas­ily arm your­self with a stack of call­ing cards for your very first out­ings at net­work­ing events. Here are four easy steps for or­der­ing your new cards, and ideas for what to put on them. Don’t skimp on your business cards.

They are cheap enough in their ba­sic pric­ing that it may be worth­while to spend the ex­tra few maloti for colour, two-sided print­ing, or even for mul­ti­ple sets. Business cards are part of mak­ing first and last­ing im­pres­sions, so be sure that your card pro­vides the right one

Do invest in sev­eral sets, es­pe­cially if you think you need dif­fer­ent ti­tles for dif­fer­ent types of job in­ter­views. Al­ter­na­tively, give your­self a longer ti­tle that works across sev- eral dif­fer­ent types of job searches.

Do not put your home ad­dress on a card. It can serve to prej­u­dice hir­ing man­agers who feel you live too far to com­mute, and pro­vide per­sonal in­for­ma­tion not needed to foster a business re­la­tion­ship.

Sim­i­larly, if you have a land line, don’t put it on the card. Put your cell phone num­ber on the card, and des­ig­nate it as such by writ­ing “cell” be­fore the num­ber. You never want prospec­tive em­ploy­ers talk­ing to your kids or spouse on a home line--and, if at all pos­si­ble, you don’t want to date your­self with a land line num­ber.

Ad­di­tion­ally, us­ing a cell phone al­lows you to eas­ily check the in­com­ing num­ber be­fore de­cid­ing to an­swer.

Long be­fore you write your first re­sume, cover let­ter, or thank-you note, draft what you’ll put on your per­sonal business card. It can help you stay mo­ti­vated, feel more pro­fes­sional, and put you in a bet­ter frame of mind for pre­sent­ing your­self at net­work­ing events and par­ties –– if not job in­ter­views. And after you’ve per­fected your re­sume, if your first business card doesn’t match your de­sired pro­file, dis­card it.

Fi­nally, don’t put cutesy graph­ics or re­li­gious sym­bols on your card. The card is about se­ri­ous business –– help­ing peo­ple stay in touch. It may okay be to place a pithy mo­ti­va­tional quote on the back as a con­ver­sa­tion starter, but it is not the place for kitty pic­tures, smil­ing suns, or sym­bols of var­i­ous af­fil­i­a­tions.

Long be­fore you write your first re­sume, cover let­ter, or thank-you note, draft what you’ll put on your per­sonal business card. It can help you stay mo­ti­vated, feel more pro­fes­sional, and put you in a bet­ter frame of mind for pre­sent­ing your­self at net­work­ing events and par­ties--if not job in­ter­views. And after you’ve per­fected your re­sume, if your first business card doesn’t match your de­sired pro­file, dis­card it.

— aol

Business cards pro­vide an easy way to po­si­tion your­self to prospec­tive hir­ing man­agers.

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