The best win­ter heat­ing op­tions

Lesotho Times - - Property -

WIN­TER is on our doorstep and many fam­i­lies will be drag­ging their trusted heaters out of their garages and store­rooms to take a cen­tral place in their liv­ing ar­eas for the next cou­ple of months.

Now is as good a time as any to re­assess whether your house­hold is in need of a new heater or a dif­fer­ent heat­ing so­lu­tion to en­sure that you’re still cosy and com­fort­able dur­ing load shed­ding.

If your heater is in good work­ing con­di­tion, but you’re in the mar­ket for a new heater, con­sider brows­ing an on­line classifieds site for bar­gains on sec­ond-hand heaters and sell­ing your cur­rent heater to earn some cash. This is ac­cord­ing to Francois Labuschagne, Prod­uct and Mar­ket­ing Man­ager for Junk Mail Classifieds, who says now is as good a time as any to re­assess whether your house­hold is in need of a new heater or a dif­fer­ent heat­ing so­lu­tion to en­sure that you’re still cosy and com­fort­able dur­ing load shed­ding.

Labuschagne says there are var­i­ous heat­ing op­tions on the mar­ket that home­own­ers should con­sider. He shares some tips and ben­e­fits…

1. When choos­ing be­tween an elec­tric or gas heater, keep in mind that a gas heater is gen­er­ally pricier than an elec­tric heater, but it costs less to op­er­ate. An­other ben­e­fit is that it con­tin­ues work­ing dur­ing load shed­ding.

2. An oil heater is more ex­pen­sive to run than a gas heater and only heats a small area, but is a safer op­tion to use in the bed­room.

3. If you pre­fer an elec­tric heater, you have two op­tions: a con­vec­tion or ra­di­ant heater. A con­vec­tion heater, such as an oil or ce­ramic heater, is en­ergy ef­fi­cient if you’re heat­ing a large, closed area for a short pe­riod of time.

A ra­di­ant heater, such as a bar or flat panel wall-mounted heater, heats the area im­me­di­ately around it and is there­fore ef­fi­cient enough to keep peo­ple in a smaller room warm for a few hours.

4. An elec­tric fan heater is af­ford­able and por­ta­ble. It’s best suited for use in con­junc­tion with other heaters.

5. Look at the amount of power the heater re­quires and its ca­pac­ity to ef­fec­tively warm up the room of your choice. The in­for­ma­tion will be dis­played on the pack­ag­ing or will be in the man­u­fac­turer’s in­struc­tion man­ual.

6. Opt for heaters with an ad­justable ther­mo­stat or pro­gram­mable timer as they al­low you to save en­ergy costs over time.

7. A fire­place, whether wood, gas or ethanol, still works, even dur­ing load shed­ding.

8. Un­der­floor heat­ing is an­other heat­ing op­tion. It’s more cost-ef­fec­tive to in­stall un­der­floor heat­ing when you’re ren­o­vat­ing your floors. Choose a pro­gram­mable op­tion so that it switches on and off at the de­sired times and heats the room to a spec­i­fied tem­per­a­ture.

9. Elec­tric blan­kets make your bed cosy, but turn down the heat when you climb into bed to save en­ergy.

If you’re brows­ing on­line clas­si­fied sites for sec­ond-hand heaters, be a savvy on­line shop­per and en­sure that the elec­tri­cal equip­ment you’re buy­ing is safe and with­out faults.

Ask the seller if you can view the prod­uct and whether you can re­turn it if it isn’t work­ing once you’ve used it at home.

When you in­spect the heater, check that the ca­ble and plug are in good con­di­tion with no pro­trud­ing or loose wires.

Labuschagne says to switch the heater on to con­firm that it’s work­ing. Iff pos­si­ble, he says buy a prod­uct that is s still un­der war­ranty, has an in­de­pend- ent test­ing com­pany’s stamp of ap­proval, such as the SABS, and comes in the orig­i­nal pack­ag­ing with the in­struc­tionn man­ual in­cluded.

Great bar­gains on sec­ond-hand itemss can be found on­line with thou­sands off items for sale at any given mo­ment.

“Make sure that you have all the in­for- ma­tion you need to se­lect the right heat­ting op­tion that will serve your fam­ily foror many win­ters to come.” — Prop­erty24

A GAS heater is gen­er­ally pricier than an elec­tric heater, but it costs less to op­er­ate.

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