CA­REER COACH GIVE YOUR CA­REER A BOOST

NO MAT­TER HOW HARD YOU TRY, YOU CAN’T SEEM TO MOVE UP THE CA­REER LAD­DER. READ ON FOR TIPS ON HOW TO GET AN EDGE IN THE OF­FICE.

CLEO (Malaysia) - - GUY SPY -

You have the marks of a good em­ployee – you’re hard­work­ing, in­tel­li­gent, and get along very well with your co-work­ers. But as we all know, the mod­ern work­place de­mands a lot more from us if we truly want to shine. Here are three ar­eas you could work on to im­prove your pro­fes­sional stature.

YOUR VOICE MAT­TERS

As much as we want to be­lieve that the work­place is gen­er­ally fair, and that phys­i­cal at­tributes such as our height and ap­pear­ance don’t con­trib­ute to our ca­reer pro­gres­sion, stud­ies seem to sug­gest oth­er­wise. Ac­cord­ing to Arianne Co­hen, au­thor of tall peo­ple make more money – in fact, they make USD789 (RM2602) more per inch, per year (up to a limit, of course). What’s more, new re­search sug­gests that peo­ple also judge you ac­cord­ing to your voice – and we’re not talk­ing about your ora­tory skills.

Ac­cord­ing to a 2012 study in­volv­ing 120 ex­ec­u­tives con­ducted by Quan­ti­fied Im­pres­sions, a com­mu­ni­ca­tions an­a­lyt­ics com­pany based in Texas, the sound of a per­son’s voice strongly influences how other peo­ple per­ceive her. The team of re­searchers used a so­phis­ti­cated soft­ware to an­a­lyse voices and col­lected feed­back from a panel of 10 ex­perts and 1000 lis­ten­ers. From the data

RAN­DOM FACT

they col­lected, they dis­cov­ered that the qual­ity of a speaker’s voice mat­tered twice as much as the con­tent of what was said!

The study also re­vealed that those with voices that were de­scribed as rough, weak or strained tended to be re­garded as neg­a­tive, weak,

SOURCE: SUR­VEY BY LINKEDIN

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