LUST FOR LIFE AN EX­ER­CISE IN LOS­ING YOUR COOL

WHY IT’S SOME­TIMES BET­TER TO JUST LET IT ALL OUT.

CLEO (Malaysia) - - PROMOTION -

We’ve all been there. You’re at work and your boyfriend/mum/friend calls and un­know­ingly an­noys you to no end. But you’re at work so you just have to hang up, ig­nore it, and get on with things. Cut to later that evening and you’re in­ex­pli­ca­bly shout­ing at your cat for not eat­ing its food.

CRANKY PANTS

When women ex­pe­ri­ence an un­pleas­ant emo­tion – like anger, sad­ness, guilt or stress – we tend to ig­nore it in the hope that it will go away. Af­ter all, we’re taught from a young age that ladies don’t lash out and vent. But think of neg­a­tive emo­tions as be­ing like bad re­al­ity TV: They just keep com­ing back in dif­fer­ent forms, no mat­ter how many times you change the chan­nel. “A while ago, I was hav­ing prob­lems with my then-boyfriend,” re­calls Eva, 25. “We would fight at home and I’d still be up­set when I ar­rived at the of­fice. Ob­vi­ously, I had to try and keep it to­gether, but I was so tightly wound that I started snap­ping at my work­mates for the most mi­nor things.”

It’s not just peo­ple around you who feel the con­se­quences of this; it also does you no good to be known as the woman who’s tem­per­a­men­tal, es­pe­cially at work. One lesser known ef­fect of al­low­ing your feel­ings to brew till break­ing point is that it can also wreak havoc to your health. Lis­ten to what psy­chol­o­gist Dr. Mary Casey has to say: “Ig­nor­ing your emo­tions is a recipe for dis­as­ter. When it reaches its limit, it can

NEVER ONE TO HIDE HER FRUS­TRA­TIONS ON THE COURT, TEN­NIS STAR SER­ENA WIL­LIAMS DEMON­STRATES HOW TO LOSE ONE’S COOL.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Malaysia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.