MAHB: Film

For a com­pany call­ing it­self the “House of Ideas”, Mar­vel’s movies sure feel like same ol’, same ol’.

Esquire (Malaysia) - - CONTENTS - mahb / film by Gavin yap mcya­pand­fries.com @gavyap

no one wants to be­lieve that the fu­ture is prob­a­bly go­ing to suck. Yep. Global warm­ing is real, the world is over-pop­u­lated, we pol­lute at a rate that our planet will never be able to cope with, and to top it all off, as a species, we seem hell-bent on driv­ing ev­ery other species into ex­tinc­tion. That’s our fu­ture. The planet’s screwed. We’re screwed. Our kids are screwed. Thank God I don’t have any, and thank God for movies.

But wait. Aren’t movies dy­ing the same mis­er­able death as our planet? For an art form that

“I didn’t want to do another Mad Max movie be­cause I’d done three and I do have a lot of sto­ries that I want to tell,” Miller said at last year’s San diego Comic Con­ven­tion. “But the story came to me over 12 years ago, and I kept on push­ing it away. I al­ways find that those sto­ries that keep on play­ing in your mind are the ones that you should pay at­ten­tion to.”

prides it­self on be­ing tech­nol­ogy’s bitch, forc­ing us to wear 3D glasses that would make even Ryan Gosling look like a schmuck, and to choke on high frame-rate im­ages of things that were con­jured up on a com­puter some­where in New Zea­land, film cer­tainly shows a bizarre des­per­a­tion to re­visit the past. Over and over again.

I’ve talked many times about how Hol­ly­wood only seems con­cerned with re­hash­ing prod­ucts that come with a built-in au­di­ence—se­quels, re­makes, re­boots, book adap­ta­tions, TV adap­ta­tions, board game adap­ta­tions, toy adap­ta­tions—and y’know what? I’m tired of be­ing right. Sure, I’m gen­er­al­is­ing. So what? If you want to read some­thing more spe­cific, why don’t you lock your­self in your mum’s bath­room and get to work on that Bergman dis­ser­ta­tion you keep flirt­ing with?

In the mean­time, go ahead and lie to me and tell me that last month’s Avengers 2 [pic­tured] doesn’t look like ev­ery other damn Mar­vel film since the first Iron Man came out back in 2008. It’s the ex­act same Happy Meal; only this time, it comes with ex­tra pat­ties—with meat from about a hun­dred dif­fer­ent cows, by the way. Hey, I’m not say­ing I’m not go­ing to watch it. Then again, I’m not say­ing I’ll never eat a Big Mac again ei­ther.

What about San Andreas? A disas­ter film? Re­ally, wow, that’s never been done be­fore, right? I mean, ex­cept for all the other disas­ter films that have been made since, like, the early 20th cen­tury. Plus, I’m sick of see­ing LA get de­stroyed. Why can’t some­thing hap­pen to Sin­ga­pore? I’d go see that. Hell, even Sin­ga­pore­ans would go see that!

On the plus side, the new Mad Max movie looks pretty cool. No CGI to be found in its trail­ers, but even then, you’re still look­ing at a re­boot, no mat­ter how di­rec­tor Ge­orge Miller tries to spin it. Again, I’m not say­ing I’m not go­ing to watch it; I’m just say­ing we should call it what it is—fast Food Cin­ema. And if the fu­ture seems bright to you, it’s prob­a­bly be­cause you’ve be­come ad­dicted to the taste of Big Macs.

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