In­dian

Expatriate Lifestyle - - Kuih -

In our ex­pe­ri­ence, In­dian kuih em­braces the same phi­los­o­phy as the rest of In­dian cul­ture: colour­ful and over-the-top. The sweet kuihs, in par­tic­u­lar, are very sweet and are known col­lec­tively in In­dia as mithai. Laddu is one of the most com­mon types of th­ese and is a con­fec­tion made from dif­fer­ent com­bi­na­tions of grains, fruits and sugar, which is cooked in ghee (clar­i­fied but­ter) and moulded into a bite-sized ball. You’ll of­ten see th­ese at cel­e­bra­tions or re­li­gious fes­tiv­i­ties.

This flour, sugar and ghee com­bi­na­tion forms the ba­sis of many other mithai. Mysore pak is fudgy, while so­han pa­pdi is flaky and uses milk, but the in­gre­di­ents are nearly iden­ti­cal oth­er­wise. Con­fus­ingly enough, there are even vari­ants within one type of kuih: the pic­ture above shows both the flaky so­han pa­pdi and another type that looks like a Swiss roll, but feels harder. Then you have the brightly-coloured co­conut candy that crum­bles in your mouth; we rec­om­mend small bites to avoid sugar over­load!

Savoury-wise, the vadai is pop­u­lar – another col­lec­tive term to de­scribe fried snacks. Dif­fer­ent va­ri­eties of lentils, called dal (if you’ve ever had roti canai, that’s what the yel­low gravy is made from) are of­ten used to make th­ese. The fluffy dough­nut-like medhu / ulundu vadai is usu­ally eaten for break­fast, while the flat­ter par­rupu vadai is more flavour­ful. Then there are the tri­an­gu­lar samosas, heartier snacks with fill­ings in­clud­ing minced meat and pota­toes in a crispy shell. Eat th­ese pip­ing hot for max­i­mum ef­fect.

The fluffy dough­nut­like medhu/ ulundu vadai is usu­ally eaten for break­fast, while the flat­ter par­rupu vadai is more flavour­ful”

6 5 1 7 4 2 3

1. ULUNDU VADAI 2. LADDU 3. MYSORE PAK 4. SAMOSA 5. PAR­RUPU VADAI 6. SO­HAN PA­PDI WITH MIXED NUTS 7. CO­CONUT CANDY

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