Malay

Expatriate Lifestyle - - Kuih -

Co­conut fea­tures heav­ily in Malay kuihs, whether it’s shred­ded or san­tan (co­conut milk). While flavour­ful, this does mean that the kuihs have to be eaten fresh or re­frig­er­ated as they will spoil oth­er­wise. Palm sugar ( gula Me­laka) is also a com­mon in­gre­di­ent in th­ese kuihs and gen­er­ally forms the fill­ing. Like Chi­nese and Ny­onya kuihs, most Malay kuihs are steamed, some­times in ba­nana leaves for added fra­grance.

The green-and-white serimuka is one of the most pop­u­lar kuihs – it’s easy to like with its sweet green pan­dan (screw­pine)-flavoured cus­tard layer atop gluti­nous rice. It’s of­ten con­fused with kuih talam, which has a white layer of co­conut milk, rice flour and green pea flour on top of a denser green pan­dan layer, thanks to the ad­di­tion of tapioca flour. Then there’s the chewy kuih bingka ubi (baked tapioca cake), which is said to be best when crispy brown.

On­deh-on­deh, chewy rice flour balls that burst with gula Me­laka when bit­ten, is a fan favourite too. Then there’s kuih koci, a tri­an­gu­lar rice flour dumpling stuffed with gula Me­laka and co­conut; or the steamed kuih ko­sui made from gula Me­laka, rice flour and tapioca starch. That’s to say noth­ing of kuih ke­tayap – a rolled pan­dan pan­cake filled with co­conut and gula Me­laka – or kuih lopes, a gluti­nous rice cake with gula Me­laka syrup poured onto it. Yes, the in­gre­di­ents are sim­i­lar but to the kuih con­nois­seur, each one is a lit­tle piece of heaven unto it­self! EL

6 9 4 1 2 7 3 10 5 8

1. ON­DEH- ON­DEH 2. KUIH KE­TAYAP 3. KUIH KOCI 4. KUIH SAGO 5. PU­LUT INTI 6. KUIH KO­SUI 7. KUIH LOPES 8. SERIMUKA 9. KUIH BINGKA UBI 10. KUIH PU­TERI AYU

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