EVO­LU­TION OF GAM­ING GRAPH­ICS

More than just looks.

GAX (Malaysia) - - GAX / FEATURE - by Az­izul Rah­man Is­mail

VIR­TU­ALLY IM­MER­SIVE

Although the con­cept was talked about as early as the 1950s and games hit the ar­cades in the 1990s, the next evo­lu­tion of gam­ing graph­ics started in earnest re­cently with the re­lease of the Ocu­lus Rift, HTC Vive, and PlaySta­tion VR.

Vir­tual re­al­ity goes be­yond 3D, it is about im­mer­sive­ness by trans­lat­ing the gamer’s pres­ence and move­ments into the vir­tual world as well. Just to be clear, VR is not the same as the Famicom 3D Sys­tem and the Sega 3D Glasses. These tech­nolo­gies just made game graph­ics look 3D and do not trans­late a gamer’s head move­ment as in­put in the game.

This graph­i­cal ad­vance­ment takes all that the in­dus­try has learned from 3D, dou­bles it to make it three di­men­sional, in­creases its frame rates to im­prove re­sponse and re­duce nau­sea, and forces game cre­ators to put ex­tra ef­fort on graph­ics as the tech­nol­ogy in­her­ently in­vites play­ers to ex­plore a game world like never be­fore. HALF STEPS AND NOVELTIES Ro­to­scop­ing This is the tech­nique and vis­ual style that uses pre-recorded video per­for­mance of ac­tors and an­i­mat­ing them into sprites and move­ment. Only a hand­ful of games used this tech­nique and among them, the most no­table are Prince of Per­sia and The Last Ex­press. Ro­to­scop­ing helps game mak­ers cre­ate smooth and re­al­is­tic an­i­ma­tion, but be­cause it is an­i­mated, it also saves space.

“Vir­tual re­al­ity goes be­yond , it is about im­mer­sive­ness by trans­lat­ing the gamer’s pres­ence and move­ments into the vir­tual world as well

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