GROW­ING UP IN THE ’90S

Herworld (Malaysia) - - EDITOR ’S NOTE - Eena Houzyama, Ed­i­tor Tweet me at @eena_her­worldmy I would love to hear your thoughts!

There is some­thing about liv­ing life in the ’90s that made ev­ery mo­ment mem­o­rable. Those were the years be­fore we got ‘ad­dicted’ to check­ing our mo­bile phones ev­ery few min­utes. A time when meet­ing up with friends meant chat­ting face to face, freely and with­out the urge to post the day’s ac­tiv­i­ties on so­cial me­dia to proof to your so­cial cir­cle that it ac­tu­ally hap­pened. Yes, I thor­oughly en­joyed my teens as it was a time when the mu­sic scene was boom­ing, go­ing to watch movies with friends was the high­light of my week­end, and there were var­i­ous life lessons to learn in­di­rectly from TV shows each week, whether it was Fresh Prince of Bel Air or F.R.I.E.N.D.S.

One of my favourite shows to watch ev­ery Satur­day morn­ing was Oprah’s talk show. I would make sure to sit in front of the TV min­utes be­fore it started and re­main there through­out the show. It didn’t mat­ter if her top­ics were some­times too ‘adult’ for me – it al­lowed me to keep an open mind when it came to top­ics such as gen­der qual­ity, women’s em­pow­er­ment and re­la­tion­ships. It al­ways amazes me how Oprah is able to share com­plex ideas in such an easy-to-un­der­stand man­ner.

An­other key point of hav­ing grown up in the ’90s was not ex­pe­ri­enc­ing racial dis­crim­i­na­tion. Never in my high school years did I feel that we only made friends with those of the same race. It was never an is­sue. So, when YB Han­nah Yeoh men­tioned in the cover story, “Peo­ple should be cho­sen for jobs based on their merit, not skin colour. Peo­ple need to be treated with re­spect.” – it truly res­onated with me. I have much re­spect for her vi­sion and hope that we, Malaysians, will move for­ward to em­brace all in good faith.

Happy Malaysia Day!

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